Phone Question on Cable/Traditional

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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

you live.
Lou
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LouB wrote:

But they use a different method and the traditional 911 is much more robust. With "regular 911" the telco sends info directly to the call center and everything pops up on the operators screen. Its a robust system since everything is directly connected. The VoIP carriers actually make an automated phone call to a regular voice non-emergency number at the call center you designate. The call has to work, someone has to answer it and then understand the message and key the information in.
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wrote:

Agreed. So can INCUMBENT telco landline service, but not even close to "easily".
And you can bet that the INCUMBENT (former RBOC - Regional Bell Operating Company), still subject to performance testing and requirements, will provide service in the same emergency that is SUPERIOR to the lesser-capable [cable TV company] phone service that is less tested or required to comply with performance minimums.
In the event of "slow dialtone" from landline service in a disaster area, one need only STAY on the line and dialtone will be presented eventually.
I suspect that current wireless technology requires constant "redialing" to eventually, if ever, complete the call as, I believe, wireless calls fail or time-out after a preset, relatively short interval.
--
:)
JR

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On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 10:24:33 -0600, Jim Redelfs

[snip]
When Ike hit here, cable phone was out for 28 hours (or more). Regular phone service wasn't out at all.
Their (cable company's) battery backup lasted 4 hours, and it was another 28 hours before they got a generator connected to the cable node.
[snip]
--
46 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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911 center also easily overloaded.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
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LouB wrote:

If you can't get through, emergency services isn't going to have anyone to send to help you anyway. Best to wait until things calm down if you can. If you can't, put your head between your legs and kiss your ass goodbye...
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snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Not necessarily so. Cell circuits get overload with a zillion "are you OK" or "I am OK" calls having nothing to do with NEEDING help. Regular circuits do also.
Lou
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LouB wrote:

A little programming could block 90% of trivial calls allowing only 911 calls to go through. It could be an interesting twist to giving more control of the network over to FEMA for emergencies. I know that at one time, the national phone system could be basically taken over by the federal government during The Cold War. If I'm not mistaken, the feds have their own separate network now. All that extra fiber that was run during The Internet boom and bust hasn't gone to waste.
TDD
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wrote:

Define "trivial calls".
If emergency workers are trying to coordinate the efforts via cell- phone, how would they do that?
You might respond by saying that "official" emergency workers would/ should have their own network, but what about the thousands of workers from volunteer organizations that are helping out?
At any given disaster, there are innumerable people who chip in to supplement the "official" workers - people whose skills and efforts are really needed. If only 911 calls were allowed to go through, their efforts would be extremely hampered.
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

And then there is the law of unintended consequences. Cell systems can prioritize traffic but they don't. Lets say there is an emergency of some sort and you are trapped. The all knowing and powerful FEMA workers are yammering away on their prioritized phones and your phone no longer works because it doesn't have the right priority.

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George wrote:

911 calls are now allowed to any cell phone even if it's not registered to a particular network. Dang feller, you didn't get that?
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

But I was commenting on this:
"It could be an interesting twist to giving more control of the network over to FEMA for emergencies."
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George wrote:

Well, FEMA is part of Homeland Security now so I suppose they can do whatever in the hell they want to do. They got lots of guns.
TDD
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If you can get away from the TSA and deal with the police, you'll be okay.
My squeeze was taking a flight from Houston to New Orleans to attend a trade show. As you can imagine, lots of scurrying about with last minute details.
Anway, as she was going through the X-Ray security, the machine went "TILT" over the pistol in her purse!
Immediately she was taken to a room in the basement, one bright overhead light, drain hole in the middle of the floor, strange terminals and protuberances on the walls.
Cops come in. "Tell us about the gun," they say.
"You'll find a concealed handgun license in my purse," she replies. They do.
"Go forth and sin no more," the cops say.
They wouldn't let her take her gun on the plane; her son had to go to the airport and retrieve it from the constabulary.
But everybody on the TSA shift got a Gold Star beside their name that day.
--
I was pulled out of line while waiting to board for "Additional Random
Screening." The TSA droids had picked four of us at random: Me, a senior
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HeyBub wrote:

once a gun is in their hands, you never get it back, even if no law is broken. Taken for elimination purposes, recovered stolen property, whatever. And since the leftish folks think guns in civilian hands are EVIL, none of the 'public interest' groups holds the local power structure to account over it. Most individuals can't afford to hire a lawyer over a $400-500 gun, so, there you go.
-- aem sends....
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<snip>
Don't mind me...just testing.
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

priority' on AUTOVON in the old days. It bumps civilian cell calls. As to the wireline federal networks, they are mostly virtual networks at this point, riding leased lines or the public switched lines. Try dialing 10-10-FTS sometime. Yeah, the line between ATT Long Lines and the Fed was rather fuzzy in the old days. Not so much anymore, but the fed phone network is still basically a Bellcore creation.
-- aem sends...
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aemeijers wrote:

From what I've read about the Cold War era AUTOVON system is that it ceased to be used in the 1990's replaced by DSN. I'm sure the feds have their own pathways through the national network but there's some really bizarre proprietary stuff me and thee will never see that they use for secure communication. I spent some time at a US Missile Defense Command facility 20 years ago and there was a lot of secure microwave, satellite and fiber optic communication equipment there. Now, there's no telling what they are using but it certainly takes up less space.
TDD
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HeyBub wrote:

connectivity to the outside world is through a single pipe, if that pipe has any problems, you are cut off. I have 3rd-party DSL that rides a separate pair of wires. I have had it go down, and the POTS dial tone still worked. I have had the POTS dial tone go down, and the DSL still worked. I have Satellite for TV, but I also have a roof antenna for days the satt is being cranky. I even have a toy pre-paid cell, mainly for travel, but I still keep a 2-way radio in the car.
Yes, I always recommend to people that they keep their copper line. I also recommend they keep one stone-age line-powered corded Real Telephone plugged into it. Like the ones they had in the house as a kid, the Ma Bell WE style. Modern phones are disposable, and subject to silent failures. The old 500/2500 desk sets are damn near indestructible.
-- aem sends....
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aemeijers wrote:

This is a very interesting discussion, but we still haven't heard back from the OP as to whether 911 is the reason why he wants to run both cable and TelCo phone service.
Hey Bert - you still out there?
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