Phone Filters

We were advised that because our DSL is coming thru a separate data line, there would be no need to install phone filters on the individual phones. However, even when everything was working OK (which is not the case at present) there has been static. Sometimes it was mild but other times it was terrible. Whenever, I pulled the DSL wall insert from the jack, the static cleared.
Where do I buy filters and are they difficult to install?
I would research this on the internet but right now the DSL is down and I'm lucky to be able to access Usenet with a very slow dialup backup connection. Thanks
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Murriel wrote:

Radio Shack
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On Sun, 14 Jun 2009 21:56:23 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@here.org (Murriel) wrote:

That sounds right. Maybe there is some other source for the static, but you might as well eliminate this one as a possibility.
However, even when everything was working OK

They came included with my DSL. Maybe your dsl provider would send you some. If you buy them, you need by only one and connect it at one phone, and see if it helps.
One of the five they sent me didn't work. I plugged a second one in insseries and when that worked, I took out the first one.
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Similar thing happened to my friend. I looked behind her wall plate and the phone installer left a terminal nut loose inside! It was making an intermittent connection, causing the static. So be sure to check for any loose connections. I've never had static caused by a DSL filter itself.
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Your dsl provider should provide a filter. If you can put it on the telephone line where it enters your house, on your side of the network protection/demarcation point, you can split the data and phone lines right there, and then use the old telehone distribution lines thruout the house, and route the DSL tap whrever you want it. THe DSLfilter/ lack of filter connection by itself cannot add static, but if the data line is not good, it can add static to the main line. You really have to start trouble-shooting at the house side of the network interface point and work from there.
Having worked for AT+T Bell Labs for 44 years, I have trouble-shot lots of interesting problems, and step-by-step from the access point is the best way to go.
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wrote:

Try plugging a regular phone into the NID, to elminate interior home wiring troubles
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I had a normally operating phone system first, then the ISP guys came in to fine tune the system as I was getting some drop off with the computer.. They fiddled around a while and everything works fine now. I asked if they put in a "filter" and they said no.
BTW, our ISP company provides phone support AND FREE home visits if that's what it takes. IMO (and theirs) its their responsibility to make sure you get satisfactiry service/connection
Give yours a call and ask if they do the same..if so, let their guys worry about getting it fixed properly.
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snipped-for-privacy@here.org (Murriel) wrote:

Your DSL service is either *ON* your voice line or it is being delivered on a SECOND line (separate pairs), whether there is dial tone on that second line or not.
If the latter is the case (a TRUE, second "line"/pair), you have crosstalk between the pairs. This is due primarily to non-standard wire with insufficient twist in the pair or, worse, no twist at all. This is virtually always in the wiring in the home or business. There is NO fix for this with the possible exception (in YOUR case) of adding a filter at each phone or phone device.
In the 6-7 years following divestiture (break-up of the Bell System), many, MANY homes were wired with improperly manufactured telephone cable in their walls. This fact did not become apparent until the customer added a second, ostensibly separate service for a teenager or home business. It was at this point that the crosstalk became apparent and the customer could literally hear the conversation taking place on the other line. Then came the dial-up modem.
Many subscribers added a second line only when they could no longer stand sharing a single line with a modem addict. The squealing of the modem was often clearly heard on the adjoining pair.
Your DSL is probably causing similar problems. Filtering the DSL pair AT THE DEMARC, then sending it to the modem on a DEDICATED, separate pair (Cat 5e is good) provides the best service and eliminates the need to filter every phone or device.

Call your telephone company and ask for some. They should be mailed to you at little or no cost. Otherwise they can be purchased at Radio Shaft(sic), Home Depot, Lowes or perhaps even Walmart.

No. They simply plug into the telephone wall outlet and the phone or device is then plugged-into the output jack of the filter.
Placing a single filter "ahead" of everything as described above requires more work and technical expertise than simply filtering everything individually.
FWIW: Do NOT filter the DSL modem. Yeah, yeah, I know. You're not a dummy but you'd be AMAZED at the number of repair calls I made and removed a filter from the DSL modem. Good luck!
--
:)
JR

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