Pex tube to copper compression fitting slipped off...

Oh boy, good thing I was home when this happened, I used 1/2" Pex (zurn) to 1/2" copper (i.d.) Compression fittings. These are all plastic fittings and "grip" onto the piping with metal rings that dig into the pipe. Well, apparently I did not tighten the nut good enough and while working in the basement, I heard a sudden rush of water flowing out of one of the lines. I quickly turned the valve above the line off and noticed that fitting had slid right off of the copper line. Oh great, because I did all of them in a new bathroom remodel like this. Now I am thinking I should just dish out the 100 dollars for the crimping tool and rings and crimp all these pex connections rather than using these compression fittings. Does this sound like the right way to do it, or should I just tighting these fitting a little more and not worry too much about it.
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that I looked at were labeled "not for in-wall installation" or something similar. The place that sold you the PEX would probably rent you the tool.
Bob
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On the PEX side the metal rings grip into the pipe: on the copper side there's no metal ring digging in.

Problem with copper compression fittings.

I realize it's not much help now that you've finished but you should have used the compression fitting with the metal ring on the PEX side and either soldered a male threaded fitting on the copper and used one half of a union to mate with the PEX fitting, or soldered one half of the union directly to the copper pipe. Normally this problem doesn't arise because the PEX usually has to terminate at a drop-ear ell. I've never seen a drop-ear ell using a compression fitting or a direct connect to the PEX so you have to solder something into it: a short nipple and either directly to half a union or via the male threaded terminator is the best way IMO.
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snipped-for-privacy@NotRealISP.gov wrote:

There's a ferule on the copper end as well...

There's no inherent problem w/ copper compression fittings...they've held for years for countless joints.
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wrote:

I've looked at that PEX. I wouldm't even consider using that crap in my house. The stuff is made so that any idiot can cram the pipe into the fitting and do a quick plumbing job. Well, I suppose it does a quick job, but how long will it last? Plastic deteriorates and when its held into a pressure fitting, the surges in the water are going to continously bang against those clamped ends till one of then breaks.
Do as you wish, but I personally value my home and posessions too much to use inferior plastic crap for plumbing. I'm not even that fond of glued PVC but at least that becomes one solid mass once the glue drys. PEX looks like a great way to add a sprinkler system to a lawn, but in my house I only use sweated copper, or even galvanized steel.
Good Luck - you may need it.
Mark
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