PEX Plumbing

I have a dual basin bathroom sink, with out dated / ugly faucets. I want to replace both faucets, which are now fed by copper piping. To connect my new faucets, to the current copper pipes would be difficult! (I do not llike to sweat solder copper pipes, especially near a wall).
I have seen PEX tubing as an easy option, for plumbing upgrades. I would like to use PEX and Shark Bite connections. Are there any "Beware Of" traps; that I should be aware?
Note: I am not concerned if a PEX solution might cost a bit more, than a few copper fittings! That is a cost easily recovered, by doing the job myself! -rob
BTW: I sure appreciate the many other home improvement suggestions, that I see daily on this site.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In typed:

If I understand what you want to do correctly, you may not need to use any PEX (or CPVC, or copper, etc) at all.
If you are just replacing the faucets, you could first look to see if there are shutoff valves in place for each faucet's hot and cold lines. If they are there, and you are going to keep using the same ones, there should just be flexible supply lines going from each shutoff valve to each original faucet. When you put the new faucets in, just use new flexible supply lines to connect the new faucets to the existing shutoff valves.
If you do a Google search for --- > bathroom sink supply line <--- and then click on Google Images, you will see lots of examples of supply line connections and setups.
Or, if you have copper pipes now, and you need to install new shutoff valves for each faucet, you could just cut the copper lines and buy "push on" shutoff valves. They are shutoff valves that you just push right on to the cut copper pipe and there is no soldering, no gluing, no PEX connections, etc. Ask at Home Depot or Lowes or a hardware store etc. and they can show you these fittings. I have used them and they work great. The only thing that you have to be careful of is that the push-on shutoff valves push directly onto copper pipe (typically 1/2 inch copper). But, if instead of copper, you have that decorative chrome tubing on top of the 1/2 inch copper, the push-on shutoff valves do not push onto the chrome pieces -- they only push onto the actual copper pipe.
And, finally, if your setup is one where you actually do have to convert from copper to something like PEX to run the rest of the lines to the new faucets -- you may not need to use PEX. Instead, you could cut the copper, and then use a sharkbite-style fitting or valve that converts from copper to CPVC. CPVC is the beige colored plumbing pipe/tubing that can be glued together with CPVC cement. For a small job like this, that would be a lot easier than having to deal with PEX and PEX fittings and the PEX tool to clamp or crimp the PEX connections. Again, no soldering -- just glue the CPVC fittings together.
Good luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, June 14, 2016 at 2:23:02 PM UTC-4, Rob snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Connecting PEX to copper with Sharkbites is a piece of cake. I've done it myself where sweating would be difficult. I've even combined Sharkbites and sweating by sweating a "multiple connection/lots of turns" section on the workbench and then using a Sharkbite to connect that to the main system.
That said, I have a few questions:
1 - Why do you need to connect PEX to copper? 2 - Assuming you have a decent answer to that question, what is going to be attached the other end of the PEX? 3 - Do you have local shut-offs for these faucets? If not, that is what should be connected to the copper pipe coming out of the wall/floor. They have shut-offs that can be connected by sweating, compression or Sharkbites. Prices go up as the ease of installation goes up.

That is only partially true. The cost of the plumber's labor is only *fully* recovered if you do the job in the same manner as the plumber. If the plumber would use low cost sweat fittings and you use Sharkbites, you will only recover a part the labor costs because you will spend more on fittings.

Daily? Really? Are you sure you are reading a.h.r?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.