PEX piping question

I want to redo the piping to one bathroom plus a garden hose bib. My neighbor has a Wirsbo tool with both 1/2" and 3/4" expanders. BTW, this is code legal and standard practice in my County. Job is under-house with generous workspace.
Question:
I know what to do if I were using copper. With PEX do I simply run supply lines (hot and cold) to the vicinity of the fixtures and then change over to copper for the risers? Do I buy a manifold and split the PEX near the bathroom and run individual PEX lines to the fixtures? BTW, the bathroom is being gutted and I will have access to all of the walls. It would be nice to have no copper under the house due to freezing, although no pipes have frozen in the last 20 years.
Please advise as to common practice.
Thanks you very much,
Ivan Vegvary
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That's a whole lot of questions...unfortunately the answer.....it depends.
Depends on the house / bathroom (& kitchen / laundry) layout.
The layout for a 1 1/2 story house with stacked bathrooms would be (should be) different than a spread out ranch style.
The house I just did was a 1 1/2 story house with stacked bathrooms. I put the manifolds in the tiny utility basement with the water heater & did home runs to every fixture.
Maximum wait time for hot water (kitchen & laundry) is 15 seconds. Upstairs bathroom wait time is less than 10 seconds.
A spread out floor plan might benefit from a remote manifold (if there are mulitple bathrooms far from the water service & water heater). A hot water circulating systems might also be a good idea.
I had a different house but sold it before the re-pipe. The galv pipe was so badly choked & the runs so long that the hot water wait time was 120 seconds! I had planned remote manifolds to service to back to back bathrooms. Total demand was 7 colds & 5 hots...so manifolds make sense.
My bias is towards an easily accesible manifold with home runs, only connections at manifold & fixture shut off.
As to copper risers, PEX can easily make the sweep bend up through the wall plates. Metal & PVC sweep supports exist. I prefer to use all plastic PVC electrical conduit to protect the PEX (no kinking on bend & acts as a sleeve through the plate)
I got my stuff from pexsupply.com they have all sorts of fittings, even PEX drop ear elbow for threaded stubs or PEX "bullet" stye terminations.
PEX may be more freeze tolerant but its not "freeze-proof"
cheers Bob
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<Depends on the house / bathroom (& kitchen / laundry) layout.
Bob, thank you so much for your reply.
My bathroom is 20 feet away from the water heater and cold water source. Ranch style, single story, furthest bathroom from source. Please explain the use of manifolds. Is this simply PEX's way of not using a bunch of Tee's. In copper I would have multiple Tee's near the source and then send individual runs to the fixtures. I guess "multiple Tee's" is the same as a manifold. Are we talking about the same thing?
Additionally, you mentioned running PEX up through the floor to the fixture. I imagine they make a fitting to go from PEX to the threaded fittings on the shut-off valves.
Thank you again for your support and answers.
Ivan Vegvary
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wrote:

Here is an install manual for my brand of PEX. ( demonstrates connections, stub-out methods, part numbers, etc.)
2+ MB file ...
http://www.houseneeds.com/shop/manuals/vanguardmanablock_manual.pdf
-- Oren
"I wouldn't even be here if my support group hadn't beaten me up."
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Manifolds minimize the wait time for hot water and reduce the scalding problem when someone flushes a toilet while the shower is on. I've not seen anyone stack tees back at teh source, but it sounds like it would work the same.
-- "Tell me what I should do, Annie." "Stay. Here. Forever." - Life On Mars
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Ivan Vegvary wrote:

Yes they do. I've replaced the supply side of my copper system with PEX from the service entrance right to the shut off valves for the toilet and sinks.
FWIW: I used this: http://www.pexcrimper.com /
Soooo much cheaper than a ratchet crimper and gets into tighter spots too!
a
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You also need vise grips with that tool. Seems tough to get both in a tight space?
-- Oren
Why is there only one Monopolies Commission ?
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Oren wrote:

Have you seen the size of the ratchet crimpers? Plus, with the vice-grips, you can squeeze the tool at almost angle - I crimped connections up over the foundation sill between joists which I never would have been able to get at with a traditional tool.
This is a perfect illustration of the usefulness:
http://www.pexcrimper.com/images/testimonials.jpg
- And no, I don't work for them! ;0)
a
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a wrote:

PS - The ratchet crimpers are over $200 at the DIY stores where I live. $35? No contest.
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Makes sense to me.

I bought crimpers (Crimp master) for our master bath remodel. It was cheaper than rental for the days needed...given the long drive to rent the tool.
I ended up with another new tool:) -- Oren
Why is there only one Monopolies Commission ?
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Further to freezing if frozen more than twice in one spot it should be replaced as it pressure rating is halve of stated rating this is told to me by the rep for Bowflex remember that copper fittings will still crack if frozen
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The OP is going to use the expander system
cheers Bob
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BobK207 wrote:

Good for them.
a
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Yes, there is a stainless steel sleeve that you insert into the end of the PEX, then you attach a regular compression fitting(shut off valve) and tighten it down. Thats what you do if you dont want to put a copper stub on the end.
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Oh, and using this method, NO crimper is required
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Ivan-
I composed a reply to your questions about manifolds but it looks like it didn't post.
It included links to pexsupply.com for manifolds, PEX bullets, & drop ear elbows
I can re-write it if you want the information.
cheers Bob

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That's what they did for my new construction. Actually ran PEX up the inside wall and then used a copper tail through the drywall.
-- "Tell me what I should do, Annie." "Stay. Here. Forever." - Life On Mars
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Thanks everybody for your replies to my PEX questions. I now understand that the function of the manifold is to allow home runs and also a convenient location for all shutoff valves. Clever!
Thanks again,
Ivan Vegvary
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