pex pipe for air

Friend of mine has some pex plastic pipe left over after a job. He wanted to know if anyone has used it for an airline for an air compressor ? Not sure what the PSI ratings are for the pipe.
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Let him. Just take out an insurance policy on his life first, with you as the beneficiary.

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PVC & CPVC are "no nos" for compressed air, brittle failure is possible.
but it looks like PEX is ok
http://66.102.7.104/search?q Κche:ZmkdIs7L7_YJ:www.plasticpipe.com.cn/blog/blogger.html+pex+compressed+air+safe&hl=en
Tuesday, January 04, 2005 The introduction of PE tubing or pipes GENERAL Polyethylene (PE) is a thermoplastic material produced from the polymerization of ethylene. PE plastic pipe is manufactured by extrusion in sizes ranging from ? to 63". PE is available in rolled coils of various lengths or in straight lengths up to 40 feet. Generally small diameters are coiled and large diameters (>6" OD) are in straight lengths.Polyethylene can be used in low temperatures (0 F or colder) without risk of brittle failure. Thus, a major application for certain PE piping formulations is for low-temperature heat transfer applications such as radiant floor heating, snow melting, ice rinks, geothermal ground source heat pump piping, and compressed air distribution. CODE STATUS PE pipe is recognized as acceptable plumbing piping for water services, drainage, and sewer applications in most model plumbing codes. Verify acceptance and installation of PE piping systems with the local code enforcement authorities having jurisdiction. AVAILABILITY PE pipe and fittings are available from plumbing supply houses and various hardware retailers throughout the U.S.A. and Canada. PE pipe is generally less expensive than metallic piping materials. MARKING PE pipe must be labeled as follows: 1.The manufacturer's name or trademark 2.The standard to which it conforms 3.Pipe size 4.Material designation code (PE 2406 or PE 3408) 5.DWV if for drainage piping 6.Pressure rating if applicable 7.DR number or Schedule number 8.If the pipe is for potable water, a laboratory seal or mark attesting to suitability
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Depends on the size and temperature.
Specs: http://www.icc-es.org/Criteria/pdf/ac139.pdf
There are people using it for shop air.
http://www.diybanter.com/printthread.php?t 636
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This adresses hydrostatic pressure, not air pressure and the expansivness and explosive power of it.

Yes, they are nuts too. OSHA forbids the use of plastic tubing for air lines. If it was the right material, it would be rated for air and used by industry. They don't, neither should you. I know of people that have had serious injury when a system let loose.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

lines, and Chem-aire is a green abs pipe rated for air, and used commercially. Still plastic pipe won't cool the air like metal will.

Osha doesn't forbid the use of plastic, it forbids the use of the wrong plastic!
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NO.
Plastic tubing is rated for water pressure, not air pressure. There is a difference and it can cause catastrophic failure and flying shrapnel. When water is under pressure it expand very little and a blowout is minimal damage. Not so with air that is compressed.
There are hoses and some tubing rated for air. Only use that or copper or iron pipe. I've not seen any air ratings for pex yet.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I thought the same thing when I first saw this, but apparently PEX is OK for compressed air: http://www.plasticpipe.org/applications/productinfo03_5_1.php
Probably because it's flexible. But I don't think I'd trust it up here in Minnesota where it occasionally gets down to -30 degrees F. I would use it farther south, as long as it was protected from exposure to sunlight.
Best regards, Bob
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Unless I misread the info............
PEX-Al-PEX is ok for air but................. is regular PEX ok for air ?
I've seen it used in lots of labs for gas/air but at what pressures I do not know.
The issue with PVC & CPVC is aging, brittle failure & the generation of shards. My experience with PE is yielding failure, no frags.
I am not completely sure about the use of PEX for air & would suggest further investigation before the OP does his installation.
PEX is not UV resistant & must not be exposed to sunlight.
cheers Bob
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On Wed, 28 Sep 2005 21:48:36 GMT, "Ralph Mowery"

I'd say not a good idea, by any stretch. Vanguard PEX cautions about damages caused by solvents, etc (and kinks, scratches, gouges, discoloring, evidence of grease, or "any chemical exposure shall not be used"). As mentioned previously it's rated for water pressure.
Oren "My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
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