Pex pipe and fitting attachment

Just found out that I have going to need to replace a couple of short pipe runs. The destruction involved using conventional materials makes fishable pex look like the better choice.
Those sharbites are easy but expensive so I started looking at various methods of connecting the pipe. The crimp or clamp/cinch method using brass barbs seem to be about the most practical. All connections will be in exposed locations.
Those of you who have it or have are done it, what are your thoughts?
Colbyt
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On 3/6/2011 5:08 PM, Colbyt wrote:

I picked up the unit called "pocket crimper" which I bought on line, but have also seen at Lowe's. It crimps several sizes of the solid rings and is made to get into tight places. It is basically 2 pieces of metal that fit together like a hinge. You use a pair of locking jaw pliers, Vise Grips, to apply the pressure. It takes several squeeze to lock, and then unlock and tighten cycles to finally crimp the ring. Also, there is a kind of pinch ring, with a one-size-fits-all tool that I once saw at Lowe's. But the last time I looked (not very hard) they didn't have them. Also, there is a compression fitting system also.
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wrote:

Both you and Al have said crimped. The current crimp is done with a copper ring with a brass barbed insert. Is that what you guys mean? It may have changed from brass to copper over the years.
The second style is a stainless steel clinch ring that is sealed around the tubing over the brass barb. Like a one time use hose clamp. The end result seems to be the same. The second method is marginally cheaper for tools and not much difference in materials.
There are at least 3 other methods but those two are the easiest to use after the sharkbites.
Colbyt
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On 3/6/2011 8:01 PM, Colbyt wrote:

The ones used in my almost 2 year old house and the ones I've used, with the pocket crimper, look like copper covered with some sort of black coating. The crimper just squeezes them smaller and smaller until they compress the Pex onto the brass barbed fitting ... I'm guessing that is what you meant??? The pocket crimper is fine for an occasional house project, but you wouldn't want to do anything major. As I said before, it was designed for hard to reach places. But the nice thing is that, contrary to normal expensive tool, it does several sizes. And for $36 (shipping included) it worked for me. Here's a link: http://www.pexcrimper.com/ordering.html BTW they were more expensive at Lowe's, even without sales tax. As for the stainless steel rings, maybe your are talking about the ring with a little bump sticking out. This bump is then grabbed with the tool and squeezed, which pulls the rest of the ring tighter. Here are 2 links: http://diy.stackexchange.com/questions/1709/pex-pinch-clamp-vs-crimp-rings http://www.pexsupply.com/HydroPEX-CLAMPTOOL-PEX-Ratchet-Clamp-Tool-6852000-p
I used the copper rings, because, somehow in my electrical engineering brain, they looked more reliable. But, from what I read, both are just as good.
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wrote:

I went to find some pictures to post but you have already done a great job of that. Thanks! Those are the exact two systems that I am talking about.
They pocket crimper you show in link one is a good inexpensive version of the crimper. The ease (?) of use and prices go way up from there. There are dedicated tools, combo tools and all in one tools.
I am currently inclined towards the product in link 3 because it just seems like a more simple style. One tool for all, no adjustments, no measuring after the fact. I installed an underground water line for grandparents in 1969 using poly pipe, barbed couplers and screwdriver tighted SS clamps that is still in use today. So if it don't leak when you turn it on and it doesn't get damaged any of them should last a long time.
One thing I have become convinced of in the last month or so, the chemical soup being delivered by the water companies does not like galvanized pipe.
Colbyt
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Referring to the chemical soup, we have used well water for 40+ years, converted to Lake MIchigan water 5 years ago, still have original galvanized piping, hoping for no leaks for another 20 years when we won't care any longer.
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There used to be a place that rented small tools if you bought the materials from them. Put down a deposit and bring it back in a couple of says and its free, keep it a couple of weeks and you've bought it. Anything in between was prorated.
Jimmie
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There is also a plastic version of the Sharkbite that is cheaper and fits into smaller spaces. Think they are made by the same people that make Sharkbite.
Jimmie
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