PEX PEX PEX

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I'm just edging into the world of PEX water pipe.
I'm accustomed to the daisy-chain copper pipe installations, where the main feed might be 3/4", local runs 1/2" and sink connections 3/8".
The PEX installations I see all have a "manifold", then individual pipe runs to each faucet.
Is there a reeason for this ? Can't be more efficient. Or is it just "chancy" to daisy-chain PEX ??
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I have a Vanguard MANIBLOC manifold. *
It's 12 years old and no problems, so far. Having seen some recent new installs, it sure saves time and material. Centrally located in a home - usually in a laundry room.
* http://www.vanguard.ca/mbloctech.html
For a new build I would have PEX again.
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Our custom built 1998 home in Az had Wirsbo PEX daisychained throughout, from 1" to 3/4" to half inch.
The only 3/8" were the risers to the faucets. It's done fine for over 10 years.
Our current (2003) place has the manifold system, one for cold, one for hot. I don't notice any difference.
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PEX can be run either way -- either the manifold/home-run system or the daisy-chain system. I think one reason for the manifold/home-run approach is that it maintains water better pressre to an individual fixture than a daisy-chain setup does when another fixture is in use at the same time.
I've been researching PEX for a while now and will be using it soon for the first time in a remodel that I have going on in a property I own.
Here are a few video links that I thought were helpful:
Plumbpedia 4 PEX Water Pipe Part 1 (time 6:50):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZyVrw4gV5k

Plumbpedia 4 PEX Water Pipe Part 1 (time 6:50):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJMKVGSFc-Y&NR=1

PEXsupply.com - 6 types of PEX connections (time 8:35):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwvAzcJpM0k

<RJ> wrote:

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Oops, the second link should have said "Part 2" (not "Part 1").
Plumbpedia 4 PEX Water Pipe Part 1 (time 6:50):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZyVrw4gV5k

Plumbpedia 4 PEX Water Pipe Part 2 (time 6:50):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJMKVGSFc-Y&NR=1

PEXsupply.com - 6 types of PEX connections (time 8:35):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwvAzcJpM0k

BetaB4 wrote:

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Its my understanding that plastic pipe in general got a bad rep after the polybutalene fiasco. Even polybutalene isnt that bad if installed properly. I have it in a 20 year old house and confess I have had two leaks. Both were the result of poor instalation practice. I replaced the poly with PEX. After examining the 20 year old pipe and fittings I found no deteriation of the pipe or fittings. I would of course like to beat the crap out of the idiot who installed it.
Jimmmie
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Isn't Pex a "cross linked polyethylene"?
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on 6/12/2009 1:06 PM (ET) gwandsh wrote the following:

Yes PE = PolyEthylene. X = crosslinked.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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It's simple - They sell more PEX this way...
JK
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RJ-
You got a lot of great info in the other posts...except Big Jake's comment.
I've done two installs.....both manifold / "home run" style
I prefer this style....way fewer joints; two per run. One at the manifold, one at the angle stop.
I suppose the ease of installation is a function of the connection style chosen. I went with the expander type, I have a hand expander.
A hand expander, though very easy to use on 1/2" tube, and especially ease to use when in a comfortable position, it is a bit harder to use in a crawlspace or attic. The battery expander is rather pricey but it's VERY easy to use anywhere when equipped with the auto-rotation head adapter.
The manifold style installation: maximizes the use of single tubing size uses more tubing but fewer fittings. has connections in more convenient / easy to execute locations allows water to be shutoff on a per fixture (hot or cold) basis maintains point of use water pressure better
depending on the house / plumbing layout a medium sized house with 2 stacked baths, kitchen & laundry requires about 150 ft of hot, 200 ft of cold. a medium ranch about the same
if you do the main & branch routine..you;ve got to use varying tube size and connections / fittings all over the place.
Even if you use 1/2 the tubing by going to a main & branch system you'll save ~200 ft of tube but use larger & larger fittings...the tubing saved is going to be about $60.
IMO that worth the extra time & hassle to do main & branch....manifold is quick & easy; fewer opportunities for mistakes
cheers Bob
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On Jun 9, 10:09pm, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

Copper is a great material and in most instances very good for potable water systems.
But for a re-pipe of a classic old home PEX is a better choice, allows the re-pipe to be done with less damage to the house.
Some water conditions favor PEX over copper.
In some areas copper potable water systems contribute to water pollution; build up of copper in the environment.
The savings of PEX vs copper is not the material, it's the labor savings .....way fewer connections & connections that can be made faster than cutting & cleaning the copper tube.
It's not hose......and your experience with PEX is?
cheers Bob
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on 6/9/2009 3:17 PM (ET) <RJ> wrote the following:

The home run system allows hot water to get to the fixture directly, rather than having it go though other fixtures before it gets to the final destination. Saves time (you don't have to wait as long for the hot water to get to the fixture), Saves hot water (other parts of the piping system don't have to fill with hot water before you get it at the fixture), Saves gas or electric water heating (less hot water taken from the heater), Saves electricity on a well pump system ( less water being pumped from the system).
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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1. > Pex is very similar. Its just a matter of time till they begin bursting. 2. > The earth is FLAT
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wrote:

The earth is NOT flat. At least, not in my backyard. And, I've tried to make it so.
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On Jun 11, 12:11am, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

LM-
that's fair, your opinion, your right

and you are basing this prediction on? you vast technical knowledge? or personal experiience? your crystal ball?
PEX has been in use all over the US for YEARS......where are the failure stories

sinks/toilets can and do just burst. <<< yes they do



cheers Bob
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I doubt if the plastic that burst on your neighbor was PEX, most likely polybutylene, big difference from PEX. Ive seen copper rot out in 25 years due to the water chemistry. I like Cu where I think a rigid pipe is called for or where its going to be seen, appearances counts for something. I suspect the connections in a PEX system will fail long before the pipe does.
Jimmie
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on 6/12/2009 9:08 AM (ET) JIMMIE wrote the following:

No. The pipes and fittings that failed were not PEX or other non-metallic materials. My experience with those bursting were way before PEX was commonly used in home plumbing. As I guestimate the dates from my life's timeline, it was some period in the 1970s when there was an extended period where the temps were in the teens (F) or below. And it wasn't my neighbor. It happened in dozens of homes of strangers in the area where I used to work, and for which, I had first hand knowledge by being one of the first on scene.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Jun 10, 1:09am, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

And here I thought Frontier Gibberish was a dead language! Well done!
R
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I used to have a video clip of Johny Carson, and the Caper of the Copper Clappers. Anyone else seen that?
--
Christopher A. Young
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Yes, I have it...Johnny Carson: the "new" guys are a sad substitute
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