PEX is it any good?

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Replumb the house with PEX, and sell the copper. Win-win :)
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I'd rather ponder the meaning of life, or maybe working towards world peace .......................
Much better time and use of brain space................
Steve
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That means you get two months rent, even if it takes a year to evict someone.

It does not have to be the tenants, it can be the neighbors. If they see pex in an open ceiling, chances are, that is where they stop, no damage done.
Your simplistic approach does not mirror real life in choosing tenant.
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Thanks for all the advice and life coaching guys. I just asked a question Geeez.
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I always try to help people with just a straightforward answer to their question. Why people need to elaborate with a bunch of irrelevant BS is beyond me.
For some reason, it's just how this group "rolls".
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You innocently asked one of those "trigger" questions. Construction people are generally slow to adopt new materials and methods to replace their existing methods and materials. The existing methods and materials don't have a learning curve and don't open the "the devil you don't know" door. This is generally as it should be, particularly in respect to something that can have serious/expensive repercussions if it fails, like a plumbing system.
There is also the memory lingering of the polybutylene pipe debacle. http://www.repipenews.com PEX is an entirely different animal, and as Ed noted, it's been in use in Europe for decades.
A good plumber will install either PEX or copper correctly, and a bad plumber will mess up either. PEX is a way cheaper installation, and due to the low cost allows a different, more efficient distribution system. Google for the PEX installation manual. It will describe what to look for and how to run the lines. About the only issue with PEX is that it expands quite a bit with the change in water temperature. In one house I put in a short straight run to a washing machine, and used PEX staples to hold it in place neatly on a visible backerboard running along the foundation wall. The run is about 10' or so, and going from a cold water standing start to hot water wash the pipe expands almost 3/8" in the 10'. This must be allowed for or there can be problems. A good plumber will factor that in.
R
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Thanks for the good advice Rico. You always seem to get it right.
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snipped-for-privacy@juno.com wrote:

Giggle.
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Being a slumlord can be profitable, but you still have to provide water for the tenants, even if they don't pay the rent.
It is also possible he is just doing some renovation and this is a good time to take the copper out. Since neither of us knows, neither of us can say if it is a good idea or not.
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The Sybil story was in the news recently - apparently some of the people involved copped to it being made up.
R
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