Pet-Friendly Flooring?

We have animals that spit up, etc. on our carpeting regularly; therefore, we are planning to replace the carpet throughout our house with a pet-friendly flooring. Our pets spit up, etc while we are at work so it is often several hours before the material can be wiped up. Seems like good-quality sheet vinyl with a wood-grain pattern would be our best option as ceramic tile or laminate flooring has seams. Seams would allow the pet spit-up, etc. to soak in the cracks. Any suggestions or ideas?
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Well you might want to address why the animals are spitting up first - that's not totally normal on a routine basis.
But as to your question, if you get a good quality office carpet that cleans up very easily and is tougher than a mother to boot. The only detraction is that it looks like .....well an office carpet.
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A PET DOOR with fenced in penned in area will go a long way to fix your problem!
Our dogs come and go as they please, and the best part is we never have to open a door to let them out.
yeah sheet vinyl appears to be the best choice, and if your animals have urine soaked the floor theres only ONE solution to the odor. scrub the floor and seal with outdoor polyurethane, so that moisture doesnt allow the odor to reoccur.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Seal with shellac, then put polyurethane over it if you need to. Shellac is a very effective odor barrier.
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Eigenvector wrote:

Kidney failure is common in older dogs, & it can cause repeated vomiting. Have it checked with a simple blood test. If you catch it early enough, you can treat it.
I did not catch it early enough.
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snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net wrote:

Tile doesn't have "seams", it has grout lines, that depending on what kind of grout you use and how you seal it can be pretty much impervious to anything.
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outdoor poluurthane may not stick well to shellac, the polyurethane is a absolute seal for odors. i know what i am talking about having rehabbed my moms house, incontenient mom, step dad and dogs...
you cant scrub it off, only seal it in.
walls absorb odors, seal walls with bin or kilz after scrubing then paint with whatever you want.
concrete can be sealed with outdoor polyurethane too
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Sticks fine if you use dewaxed shellac. Shellac is the accepted odor barrier. If you want to use something else go ahead. But I wouldn't recommend an "outdoor polyurethane" for interior use.

Which is shellac.

Which is specifically formulated to replace shellac

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J. Clarke wrote:

the fire restoration industry uses outdoor polyurethane, since its waterproof. smelly when applied lasts forever. BIN is also the fire restoration standard.
I helped friends after a home fire:( I also rehabbed a urine soaked smelly home.
Both came out fine with no odors at all.
IFYOUR GOING TO DO A JOB DO IT RIGHT, DO IT ONCE THEN GO RELAX!
The cost and work difference isnt much when you have to do it again....
why not use outdoor polyurethane indoors other than initial odor?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Nothing lasts forever. Certainly nothing made of wood. Not only is outdoor polyurethane smelly, but it also may have fumes of greater toxicity than indoor and the only thing it brings to the party is UV inhibitors.
Like I said, BIN is shellac. If you want to use that particular brand by all means do so, but make sure it's fresh.

For how long? Have 10 years elapsed? 20? 30?

Which means the accepted barrier coat.

How soon do you want to occupy the premises? How much isocyanate can your system tolerate?
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J. Clarke wrote:

doesnt.
You dont want a hot humid day to generate bad odors
Incidently the urine odor mitigation was 10 years ago. I sold the home about 1.5 years ago and disclosed it had been a problem. The neighbors knew no use trying to avoid the issue. The buyer had a special contract part written in if odors should reoccur, they havent.
You dont do outdoor polyurethane with anyone living in home. It must be vacant.
so your stuck on shellac, thats fine and also know the odor will reappear. Thats true of shellac, poly is forever.
The fellow who taught me what to do was a realtor of 35 years who owned and rented property. he reported poly a plywood floor to stop odors.
THIS IS THE PROFESSIONAL APPROACH, you are free to do whatever you want and waste all the time and money you care too.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Source please? Hint, most single-component polyurethane cures in the presence of moisture.

If it does then your method failed.

10 years is not long in the life of a house.

So you want the OP to live in a hotel for _how_ long?

In an earlier post you recommend BIN, which is dewaxed shellac, or Kilz, which is marketed as an alkyd coating purpose made as a replacement for shellac. Now you're saying that if you use shellac then the odor will reoccur. So which is it?
And I did not say to use only shellac, I said to use it as an odor barrier and then put whatever you want on top of it, which includes polyurethane. I don't see why you're having a problem with that.

Oh, a realtor. Now there's an expert for you.

If this is in fact a recognized "professional approach" then you should be able to reference a standard of some kind that says so, or literature from manufacturers of polyurethane coatings recommending them for this purpose, or some other such source.
So a realtor taught you a trick and on that basis you're sure that it's the only viable approach.
Believe what you want to. Meanwhile I'll go with the standard method, which is to apply a shellac odor barrier and then an appropriate coating.
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As a FINAL COMMENT my method is the very same one used daily by fire restoration companies nationwide.
You have the choice to do whatever YOU want.
All the friends of mine who tried other things found the odors reoccured.
That realtor had over 100 units rented, he was a expert at property management and building repairs
This discussion has runs it course I wouldnt comment futher..
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

What, specifically, did they try?

And of course you can't provide one single link to support your argument.
According to, B-I-N is an adequate sealer and polyurethane is an adequate sealer but polyurethane over B-I-N is not an adequate sealer. Would you care to explain your reasoning? I thought not.
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