Pergo wood flooring, how to take apart to fix broken spot

Hi, was wondering if anyone could help me. I installed the floor about 2 years ago and now have a spot that needs to be repaired. When I did the install, I cut and glued all the pieces together and now I need to find a way to get them apart... Anyone have a good idea/plan to get the glue loosened up at my starting point?
I tried a clothes iron, to try to heat the tiles up some, but that didnt work..
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks - Aaron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A router with a straight bit and a straight edge guide. Cut the rectangle out, then cut the patch the same size then glue in place. You will need to trim the curved corners in the hole with a utility knife and chisel. Practise on some scrap first.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Aaron" wrote in message

To do this right, takes some experience and the right tools. You can not undo the glue.
Mark all 4 corners of the tile 1" in. Mark a line all the way around the tile point to point. Take a drill with a 3/8" bit. Mark the bit with tape for the depth so you don't drill too deep. Take a circular saw, with depth set precise, you don't even want to cut into the pad or vapor barrier. Cut the line all the way around. CAREFUL, so you don't cut into the good tiles, you will NOT be able to cut all the way to the hole because your circular saw blade will hit the good tiles. Take a chisel and hammer to finish the saw cut to the holes. Since you probably don't have a small suction cup made to lift out the tile piece, use a toilet plunger. Lift the existing floor up carefully with a pry bar about 1/2" on one side. Slide a piece of scrap flooring to hold up in the air (if you drill a hole through the scrape, and tie a piece of twine to it, it makes retrieving the scrape easy). Take a razor knife to finish to the corner. Take pliers and wiggle to break off the tongue and groove on one side. Do this to all 4 sides. Have a vacuum handy to keep debris from going under floor, vacuum frequently. Take a chisel GENTLY to undercut the existing floor by shaving the hidden side down. You need a router and loose tongue (8mm) bit. Set router depth to new piece. Have the existing floor elevated by your scrap slid under it. Router all four sides of the existing floor. Place loose tongue for a DRY fit. Take new piece of tile, with hidden side up(not face side up), lay on a scrap piece of plywood. Take circular saw with depth set precise to cut of existing tongue. Reset depth to cut off only the bottom of the groove. You will want to cut the bottom of tile on the sides you removed tongue, so it will rest on the loose tongue. DRY fit into area. If you need to raise the piece, use drywall tape, adding layers as needed. If too high, you can cut down the last groove with circular say. Just a tad bit more depth than precise. DRY fit again and again until perfect. Take out loose tongue, apply manufacturers recommended glue. Apply same glue to the to the tile where it will sit on the loose tongue. Double check fit to make sure there are no ridges. Place a large Glad Bag full of sand or some kind of weight on the tile for 24 hrs.
Or...... You can pay someone who does this everyday, about $150 with you supplying the tile.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank you for this great writeup, sounds WAY more complicated than I wanted to get into, but I may still give it a try. Thank you again for your insight.
Aaron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd definitely use the router, not a circular saw as it's a lot easier to control. Unless you're particularly handy, it's going to be easier to pay someone with experience to do the repair.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually I use a Makita 14.4, 3-3/8" saw, bought just for this purpose and use a carbide 20 tooth blade. I never have and never will use a router to cut out a tile or plank.
It may be easier to use a router for a novice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.