Pellet stove air intake

Page 2 of 2  
You have to figure that anytime you are pumping air out of the house - as with dryer, furnace, regular fireplace, a pellet stove , or just a bathroom or kitchen exhaust fan- air has to come back in to replace it. Unless you live in a super-insulated house, air will find somewhere to enter, or the device try to exhaust will fail to function properly. So by bringing outside air in for the combustion process in a controlled fashion as the appliance manufacture suggests, you save having that same air drawn in thu windows, doors, or what ever other opening it can find.
Since this is for the combustion, it ends up being blown out of the house via the chimney or whatever other exit point might be used by the appliance to vent combustion gas. (i.e. a high-efficiency furnace might use regular PVC pipe).
This isn't the air that is being heated by the appliance - that is the room air around the stove, which may be drawn in by a fan and circulated around the outside of the combustion chamber and heated before being blown out as hot air to heat your room.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AZ Nomad wrote:

Think about what he posted...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My pellet stove uses inside air for combustion and I don't have a problem. But my old farm house in not all that air tight either.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Shy Picker wrote:

Both of my pellet stoves are inserts in a central chimney. Outside venting isn't possible, and they work fine. And, like the last poster, this isn't an air-tight house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
K wrote:

There is no trap on the cellar drain because it don't go into a sewer. I'm sure air comes up that pipe just fine. There is a screen on the outside end to keep the little animals out. I guess it's too long a tunnel for the bugs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The dryer is certainly making a slight vacuum. If you are blowing air out, it has to be replaced somehow, usually through all the tiny leaks you have. The pellet stove (or woodstove, oil burner, gas furnace) will be venting the exhaust to the outside. As long as air is going out, more cold air is coming in. By moving the combustion air inlet to draw directly from outside, you don't take the already heated air and exhaust it to bring in new.
As for the energy, yes and no. You need a certain amount of Btu to get the air to the point it can be used for combustion. However, you are also going to take air that you paid to heat already inside the house and heat it up to burn and, as I sated, it will be replaced by cold outside air. It can even create serious drafts in some homes, depending on construction.
No house is air tight. Do some searching and you'll find information on testing that is done and how they house can be pressurized to find the leaks. Start here http://www.efficiencyvermont.com/pages/Residential/Home_Heating/Home_Information/air_leakage /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

http://www.efficiencyvermont.com/pages/Residential/Home_Heating/Home_Information/air_leakage / My point was that, if the outlet is in the middle of the house, like our center chimney, there's no way to direct outside air to the comubstion chamber without being ridiculous. Pellet stoves draw combustion air from the bottom anyhow, where it is coolest in the house, and just that draw tends to pull warmth down from the ceiling to the living zone. A pellet stove is very different in dynamic from a wood stove; more like your oil or gas burner, which don't recommend outside air.You can hold your hand on the top of a pellet stove all day without any more harm than feeling ridiculous.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Want me to send you a photo of the outside air intake on my oil burner? Or from the gas burners at work? All installed at the manufacturer's recommendation.
It may not be easy to install in your case, but the reason it is recommended does not go away. Every cubic foot of air that goes up your chimney is replace by an equal amount of air from outside. Just one of those laws of physics that we cannot get around.
Oh, and my oil burner is in the center of the house and yes, the fresh air inlet is ducted to it via 2" PVC.
Outside air ducting has another benefit in that when the stove or burner is not in operation, there is no heat loss up the chimney from air just being drawn up through it and wasted. This saves heat and the associated costs.
Personally, I don't care what you do in your house but now you know the reason for it
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

attic. There outside air can be drawn in from the roof vents and any heat leaking up through the floor can be sucked back down. Since the ceiling is right above the stove it's a short run.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Say what you will, but pellet inserts don't have intakes for outside air. Why would they, anyhow? They put the heat directly back into the home ... I can put my hand on the exhaust and keep it there when the stove is at its hottest. If your oil burner is in your kitchen or living room, where our stoves are, your intakes must be a pretty sight, and somewhat of a threat when you walk if the the air is drawn in at the bottom like it is on a pellet stove..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Say what you will, but if the is an outside exhaust, efficiency can be improved with an outside air intake. Laws of physics, not my opinion or your. Educate yourself and you will agree. My oil burner is in the basement, not the kitchen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
K wrote:

Whats the ridiculous part? Its done all of the time.
Pellet stoves draw combustion air from

Our gas boiler which heats our home has a factory designed intake for outside combustion air. It really isn't an unusual thing and it is effective.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.