Pegasus Faucet

We installed a $300 Pegasus Faucet in 2005. Last week (while on vacation) the connector for the cold water apparently failed and caused $60,000 damage to the house.
1. The plumber indicates that the wire-weave risers are both not typical of quality faucets, and not as reliable as typical copper risers.
2. While Home Depot said that Pegasus is built by American Standard, AS doesn't seem to agree.
3. Has anyone else had problems with a Pegasus faucet failing?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

I've never seen a faucet that used "wire-weave risers". I've installed a couple Pegasus faucets and they had the normal copper connections.
I suspect you are referring to the overbraided flexible supply lines that connect from the supply valve to the inlet risers from the faucet. These supply lines are not part of the faucet and are not made by Pegasus or AS. If the labels that are normally on these supply lines are not still in place you may not even be able to identify what brand they were.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I haven't opened the package for every faucet ever made, but I've installed a few faucets, and none of them came with risers. I had to provide them. If they failed, I wouldn't have blamed the faucet manufacturer.
The connector you mentioned - is it part of the riser, or part of the faucet itself?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Now that I think about it, I recall one faucet that did include some flex lines from the manufacturer. It was a faucet that accommodated variable hole spacing and had two separate valve units (hot and cold) and a spout unit, and flexible lines were provided to connect them. The supply lines were not provided however, and the lines that were provided could not cause flooding while away since they were located after the faucet valves where they would not be pressurized.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Do you still have your receipt from whoever installed that faucet for you two years ago? It may contain separately charged line items for those flexible "risers" giving the name of their manufacturer.
Unless you can prove that the particular brand and model of riser which failed has a documented history of early failure, I wouldn't hold out much hope for you and/or your insurance company getting any compensation from its maker. I'm thinking your chances of nailing someone over the failure are two, slim and none, and Slim rode out of Dodge yesterday. <G>
I agree with your plumber that properly installed solid copper risers have a better chance of lasting "forever", but the braided risers have been available for many years now, and if they burst frequently and caused a lot of trouble I think we'd have heard more about it by now.
I'd spend the few minutes it takes to check with the building inspector in your city on the very slim chance that installing those kind of flexible lines might not have been permissible in 2005, in which case, the installer, if he has assets/insurance, might end up having to pay.
Just my .02,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.