Peeling Paint - door frame

Hi,
Have a case of peeling paint on the door frame. Looks fine, but if you scrape it, even with a finger nail, it comes off quite easily. Was painted before my time. There's a layer of paint, under the one that's peeling.
Suspect it's a case of latex on oil, without a primer. Removing the top layer would be a mess. If I primed the top layer with say Kilz (or similar), would the primer penetrate the latex and attach itself to the layer below?
Do not know the age of the top layer, but could be 5 years.
TIA,
RichK
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1. No, new primer is not likely to penetrate the old colour coat and adhere to the old primer which you do not know for sure to be there.
2. Your questiion is framed as if you were sure the old colour coat flakes off leaving the old primer safely adhering. This seems unlikely, unless both (2a) the old primer was correctly applied and (2b) the old colour coat was improperly applied (e.g. surface not washed and sanded beforehand.)
You must decide between: Method A = thorough preparation (scraping or blowtorch to remove loose paint, then filling and sanding to prepare a good surface; then quality paint, both primer and colour coat. Method B = touching up, perhaps in spots, while knowing that if you guessed wrong in any one respect you will have to go to Method A later.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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I'm guessing that the sequence was: bare wood, primer, oil-paint, latex (the layer that is peeling). Whatever is under the latex is very healthy. Suspect was painted just to refresh.

I was wondering if a primer such a KILZ would penetrated the latex layer and adhere to whatever is under, which is oil-based paint most likely. Since it appears, I have several interior door in this situation, I want to pick a method, which would be least painful and at least effective.

Would you use a regular small propane torch to heat the paint? Most places sell a hairdryer type heat gun, but it seems that it waste most of the heat and not scorch the paint.
Regards,
RichK
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If you can get it off with a fingernail then stripping it should be easy, the new strippers are pretty gentle on your lungs and hands compared to years ago. Then you could just prime/paint onto the good layer. No, primer wont penetrate it and somehow re-attach the layer below.
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Guess you're suggesting a chemical stripper. Which should I use, since it would be working on both layers, which are of different paint?
The top layer would be easy to remove mechanically, but messy. Well, no paint is easy to remove :-) Bottom (I suspect oil) is very well attached to the wood.
RichK

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The one I used came in a green and white plastic bucket and was a gel from HD. It was pretty pleasant to work with not like the old lye or solvent strippers. You dont need to take it down to bare wood, just that top layer. Scrape the stripped paint, a little wire brushing, then apply the neutralizer, prime/paint when dry, it doesnt have to look perfect just down to a sound surface. Somebody probably did just slap some latex over an oil finish.
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You're talking about Citri-Strip or something like that. The problem with those types of strippers is that they can take a LONG time to dry, meaning the house could possibly be a disaster area for up to a week while trying to strip all that stuff. Sometimes it's nice to have a stripper that evaporates slowly, other times it can be a nuisance. Scrape, sand, prime, and paint.
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It wasn't Citri Strip but it was the one that has the infomercial (maybe still citris). I still find it easier to strip instead of dry scraping/sanding, maybe others would rather scrape. This stuff was not caustic like the old stuff I once used in 1984 and nearly passed out.
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A heat gun should be able to bubble up the existing paint quickly. I've done it several times. Remove the door before trying to do this, it will only get in the way. I'd also remove the hinges, since they are most likely painted over and therefore look extremely ugly.
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Is it an outside door? Is the wood solid? If not you have an installation problem (no flashing) and paint won't help.

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It's an inside door. Wood is very solid. Paint was/is doing fine, unless you accidentally scratch it. That's how I found out it would just come off. In fact, I tested a few other doors and they are all the same :-(( The doors themselves are not painted, just the frames and moldings.
RichK
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Mess or not, you need to scrape off the peeling paint, prime with an oil-based primer, and then repaint. Using a chemical stripper would be much messier, time consuming, and a bit of an extreme measure; in other words, that's a last resort.
If it's an exterior door jamb, use Cover Stain or an oil-based KILZ that explicitly states that it is for use on exteriors -- original KILZ is not designed for exterior use except for small touch-ups, and even then I'd use Cover Stain.
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I want to use latex paint. Is an oil-based KILZ the right primer in this case?
RichK
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Hi I would peel back the paint with a hand scraper try the ones with a Stanley blade in but be careful not to damage the wood. As the paint has not adhered so should not be too much of a problem, then rub down the old paint surface with sand paper to key surface, prime with correct primer if needed. Paint with oil based paint.
By the way a vacuum cleaner should be able to pick the peeling paint up off the floor with no problem. I wouldn't use a chemical paint stripper too much hassle and can be very expensive at least where I live anyway
Regards
Alex www.HomeLifeWeekly.com Smart Tips For Your Home Life
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wrote:

We had a similar problem with this house. The wood trim had been painted with oil paint so I used Kilz on it before painting with latex. It lasted a few years and started peeling. Parts of it would peel off easily and parts would not. I got something from the paint store (independent one, not Home Depot type) and it's called Painters Insurance. Don't know what is in it but you mix it one part painter's insurance with three parts water. It is clear. I sanded the spots that had come off so it was more even. Then I put one coat of Painter's Insurance on and let it dry. Then I repainted ... had to put two coats on where the old stuff came off. I started putting PI on the other trim before it started peeling and repainted ... most of it. My neighbor had the same problem. Man at the store told him he probably had a moisture problem. That could be part of it....we are in Tampa Bay area and it is always damp here.
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