peeling new paint problems

We painted our new bathroom about three months after it was plastered. We used primer and two coats of satin latex, then put a third coat of flat latex since we didn't like the shine. When we took the blue tape off the tile, it peeled a lot of the paint/primer with it, and when we went to fix it we found that large areas of primer and paint hadn't really adhered at all to the wall. It's peeling in big sections (yet stubbornly staying in others). The wall was new plaster, which we sanded, vacuumed and TSPd a few days before painting. What did we do wrong? Next time we'll take the tape off when the paint is still wet, but the tape didn't make the paint on the rest of the wall not adhere....suggestions? We're not using the bathroom yet so there isn't any particular moisture in the room. Thanks. -Holly
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I & H wrote:

Was that real plaster or drywall?
How long did you wait from the time you first painted and when you removed the tape?
TSP ?? Yea I know what it is, but was it real TSP or a new replacement in those areas that the original is no longer available? How well did you rinse after using it? Was the wall painted before this? I sort of suspect the problem may be insufficient rinsing of the TSP.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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It is real plaster, not drywall, and the tape was on for a while, a few weeks, which would certainly account for some peeling at the edges, we now realize. The TSP I guess was new. It's TSP-PF (phosphate free) and we may not have sufficiently rinsed. Have others experienced similar problems caused by the reformulated TSP and not thoroughly rinsing? The wall was not previously painted. -Holly

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I & H wrote:

I haven't read any scientific studies, but would be inclined to believe the plaster was not dry when you began painting. Seems it could hold moisture, either from washing, showering, or humid weather. Putting on a soapy wash seems ill advised. Only reason for soapy wash is to remove soil/grease. Sanding and dusting thoroughly was appropriate.
Painters tape lifts easily when removed right away. Left on while paint dries, it becomes part of the paint film, which is really what you want from your paint :o) I left painters tape on an outdoor project, in the sun, and it turned into a hard, gooey mess. Leaving a primer on too long before painting can add to failure, as can painting wet or in too cold environ.
I'd scrape all the loose paint, patch to feather edges where paint film will not scrape off. Patch any scrape marks, sand, vacuum to remove dust or wipe with water damp cloth. Good paint co's, like Ben Moore, have all kinds of problem solutions and tech advice. Here is a link with a bit of advice about paint peeling from plaster:
http://benjaminmoore.com/wrapper_pg1art.asp?L=owner&K=howprob&N=howprob&art=1.3.4
One of the mysteries of life is what is in "non phosphate" TSP :o) Here is a link to a pretty cool website, if you want to investigate the chemistry: http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=chem&id 90
I did some quick looking on the product list, found a Spic and Span Non-Phosphate cleaner, which has some acid in it. If you used something similar, it MIGHT have reacted with the plaster to form a powdery coating or something. My brain is too old and tired to work on that aspect. A little gentle rinsing might be in order, with every effort to make the plaster as dry as possible (don't build a fire!), and a good brand product labeled for your application. Fall - dry weather - is my favorite time to paint. Good luck. Let us know :o) Don't buy paint at a box store, and don't take advice from clerks who don't have gray hair and a few wrinkles :o)
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Norminn wrote:

I don't know if they have changed the formula, but Spic and Span advertised a no-rise feature. That feature was created by adding a substance that would stay on the floor, look shinny and would be easily removed, along with any dirt, with the next use of the product. It worked on floors, but it would not be good on a wall you were planning to paint. As I recall the substance was a water soluble glue.
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I & H wrote:

Just a few weeks ago I found some tape, behind the frig, we missed when painting our kitchen over five years ago. It striped off without a problem. I did use a hair dryer to warm it up first.

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Joseph E. Meehan

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