Pedestal sinks

Why is a solid backing needed behind a pedestal sink? The pedestal does support it, doesn't it?
In any event, I'm planning to install one that I found--at a time when I was considering buying one--that had been left at the curb in great condition. It's a Glacier Bay model. Of course, I have no installation instructions, no measurement guide, no drilling pattern. Any tips about making sure I fasten the sink to the wall at just the right location?
Also, I'm not sure what kind of fasteners to use. One of the old ones was still stuck into the hole in the back of the sink--it's got a metallic anchor that runs most of the length of the bolt. I'm not sure how that works with drywall with a wood plank behind it--I thought anchors were for drywall-only attachment.
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Actually, not really. The pedestal is mostly there to hide the pipes under the sink. It's primarily decorative.
As for the questions on installation, I can't help you, but I'm sure someone here can. You might cruise through your local home depot to see if you can find out what model Glacier Bay sink you have. If you can do that, you can probably order the installation manual from the company or from Home Depot.
Good luck!
Donna
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On Jun 21, 6:25 pm, Harlan Messinger

Check the manufacturer's web site. Similar models are attached in similar ways.
The pedestal bears the weight. It has no capability to withstand an overturning force - called a moment - such as when someone is leaning on the edge of the sink.
R
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wrote:

A traditional pedestal sink, sure. Some of the modern ones I have seen, not so much. In some cases it is almost decorative. Any wall-hung or wall- fastened sink should have solid backing behind the attachment points. Even if you hit the stud spacing exactly, a row of blocking stiffens the wall against twisting and bowing. On a pedestal sink, even if the pedestal takes the sink and water weight, if a person leans or stumbles against sink, that is a LOT of leverage pulling against the wall anchors. Overbuilding stuff like this takes so little effort at installation time, that it is very cheap insurance.
As to the brackets- a plumbing supply, rather than a big-box, or perhaps a ReStore or salvage place, will likely have matching parts for you. (My sister once scored matching feet for a 80 year old clawfoot, at the first place she tried.)
aem sends....
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On Thu, 21 Jun 2007 18:25:02 -0400, Harlan Messinger wrote:

Nope the sink is supported by the backing. The pedestal just stands on the floor with some acrylic caulk to hold it in place. Just put one in 3 weeks ago.
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You have gotten conflicting advice so far in this thread. Most everyone may be right based on their experiences and the sink they installed. The better ones have a traditional style hanger bar and the pedestal for support. The cheaper ones omit the hanger bar and you have to break your back to attach it with lag bolts which are not furnished. That latter one would be the Home Cheapo $39 model.
IMO, for any of them you need wood behind the drywall. Either for the hanger or the lag bolt.
All the pedestals I have seen also have holes in the bottom of the base to screw the base to the floor. I use fender washers and #8 hex heads on wood. On concrete I use the washers and tapcons.
You may be able to buy and use a universal hanger bar if your sink takes one. Chances are you will have to go to a real plumbing supply house to buy one. The BORG just won't have it.
You can make do with out instructions by placing some masking tape on the wall, setting the sink on the base, leveling it L_R and F_B and then scribing a line on you tape. Careful measuring will then tell you where to place the hanger bar.
Have I ever hung one with out the wood? Yes for the hanger bar model. Use 3 or 4 toggle bolts and washers to attach the hanger bar. This trick will only work with a pedestal type.
Colbyt
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On Jun 21, 6:25 pm, Harlan Messinger

It's not an either/or situation - the sink is supported by both the wall anchors and the pedestal. There are sinks designed for anchoring into a wall only (some very cool, highly stylized ones, too), but I am unaware of a free-standing pedestal sink that doesn't require some sort of attachment to a wall.
Considering the pedestal, though, can only effectively handle direct, downward weight, you need solid anchoring into the wall to handle off- center forces such as when someone leans on one side of the sink and the like. Toggle bolts into drywall will certainly not handle it, nor will doing so into plaster (or plaster over lath). To ensure a sink that will last you forever without needing remounting, I would encourage some sort of refit behind the wall of a cross-piece between your studs. It's messier, more complicated and a bigger pain in the neck than maybe you want, but the work will pay for itself in peace of mind.
And like so many DIY jobs, this also is one where you get what you pay for. The higher priced sinks I've seen have better designs for anchoring and much better pedestal-to-sink fit to ensure a stable installation than do the bottom-tier set-ups I've seen (and bought) at the BBS (big box store).
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That's what I thought too. The pedestals are narrow compared to the basin. Even if they supported the entire weight, you'd need good attachment/support from the wall to keep it from falling over if someone leans on it.

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