Patching tongue and groove subflooring

Hi,
Sorry if this has been covered but my 'googleing' isn't the greatest. I'd like to bounce an idea off the group to see if I'm heading in the right direction.
I'm trying to patch a hole in my 1928 era tongue and groove 3/4" subfloor where the intake plenum for my furnace used to be. The hole is 15" along the joists in one direction and is also 15" between the joists. It's the subfloor that will be covered with carpeting so I'm not concerned how it looks. I wanted to use 3/4" CDX plywood for the patch. My idea was to use 2x6" with joist hangers installed perpendicular to the existing joists to hold the edges of my patch. Between the 2x6" under the other edges I was going to scarf in 2x4's nailed to the sides of the existing joists to hold the edges that run parallel to the existing joists. All the joists and scarfed lumber would be secured with 8d subfloor nails and subfloor adhesive. I was also thinking of using Simpson tie straps at the edges of the patch. The straps would be sucured with 3/4" subfloor screws.
Does this sound like it would work without squeaking or flexing? Are the Simpson straps overkill? Would I have problems with expansion at the joints with the straps?
TIA,
Dale
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"Dale Lorenzen @hotmail.com>" <wirelesswedgiemaker<REMOVE SPAM FOILER> wrote in message

8's aren't long enough to scab 2x lumber together. Use 16's. The liquid nails or similar is fine. The joist hangers are sort of overkill, but if it makes you comfortable, they do no harm. Use a few toe nails anyway (16d). I don't see an application for the tie straps at all. Be aware that the old subfloor may be thicker than the plywood, so the framing mak have to be "held up" a bit to compensate. Casey

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On Wed, 02 Jul 2003 22:40:15 GMT, "Dale Lorenzen"

Some might be overkill...but in general everything sounds pretty good. Just make sure you don't make the patch tight. Leave a little room for expansion. If the patch isn't tight, there's less chance for squeaking.
Have a nice week...
Trent
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wrote:

Thanks for the response. Will do on leaving the patch loose.
Regards,
Dale
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