Patching Hardboard Siding

I tried searching usenet for all variations of the subject, but it appears I'm the first in internet history to ask this one.
I've got brick on 3 sides, and only 600 square feed of Masonite siding. Most of that is fine, but down near the ground, where the water splashes up, it's got a few rotted spots. Searching the web was an effort in frustration because the siding scheisters have drowned-out any meaningful search results.
Anyway, I don't want to or need to re-side the whole back of the house, and I don't really want to remove a 8 foot board to repair a 1/2 inch on the edge, or even 2 inches on the edge, or one soggy spot near an overdriven nail head. There was one board on the bottom that was soft all along the bottom, and I pulled that one off (used recyprocating saw parallel to the face of the bad board and under the board above to cut through nails, and used the circular saw to cut vertically through the bad board, since only 4 of the 12 feet was bad).
But what I want to do is find someone (there must be someone) who has fixed hardboard lap siding (spot repair), and to learn about their technique.
What I have done works, but it's pretty painful, and I'm not sure how long it will last. Here's what I did... I scraped the wet/rotted portion out, then filled it with Elmers wood filler. Since it was a thick mass of filler, I put shims behind, and wood filler on top of that. Then, since it was so thick, I waited a long time (days) for it to dry, then removed excess by using a wood rasp. Then I filled again, sanded again, filled again, sanded again...well, you get the picture, it's a pain. If the patch was near the corner board, I caulked it with GE XST. Otherwise I just painted.
But I figured that someone would have a more efficient technique to handle the occasional rotten spot on hardboard siding.
--Dale--
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There! Now when somebody googles what I tried, they'll at least get my post, and know they're not the only one!
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I did exactly same thing, filled damaged portion with exterior wood filler, removed excess immediatly, used heat gun to dry it up.
We had woodpecker that destroyed 2 boards, one of the dozen holes was 3" wide. Woodfiller + heat gun + drywall knife + one coat of paint and we had miracle in 2 hours. My wife even couldn't tell where those holes were.
Brian
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B>used heat gun to dry it up
That's good thinking. I've gotta get me one of those.
C>Masonite has a a lawsuit payout for damages under certain conditions
Yeah, I saw that. I didn't dig really deeply into it, but it looked like my house was build outside of the date range.
B>They make Bondo for this type siding repair
I saw the Bondo, but for whatever reason, walked-off with the Elmer's exerior filler.
Thanks guys!!
--Dale--
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On 14 Oct 2005 20:28:08 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@sengsational.com wrote:

Masonite has a a lawsuit payout for damages under certain conditions.. check google for +Masonite+"class action"
They make Bondo for this type siding repair
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bigdog had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Patching-Hardboard-Siding-41347-.htm : Ditto your comment about finding useful advice on this problem on the net. I am facing a similar problem and looking for a solution. Based on my general experience with home repairs, here is what I plan to do.
The rotted "masonite" is part of a 4 x 8 (approx) exterior wall panel. It has rotted for about 2 - 6 inches along the bottom of the panel where it meets a facing board at the base of the first floor above the stone veneer. I will cut out the rotten area so that I have solid material to butt new material against. I will then install a strip of 6" x 4' material of either a cementitous fiber board or exterior paneling board of some kind. I will seal the joint where the two butt together with caulk (latex since silicon may not hold the paint I need to apply later). I will put the caulk on the edges of the two sides of the joint so that it is in the joint, not just on top of it. Because the panel board imitates a stucco finish, I will use Bondo or another auto body fiber filler to trowel on in sweeps to imitate the existing finish. Getting this right will be the hardest part, I think. Once I have the joint sealed with the bondo and the texture matched, all I should need to do is match the paint with a couple of coats to seal it good. If it was a small spot, using something like wood filler could work, but my areas are too large for that approach. Anyone with suggestions is welcome to email me at snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com.
From the Big Dog
snipped-for-privacy@sengsational.com wrote:

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