Past Wiring Codes

Page 2 of 2  
On Mon, 12 Nov 2012 05:52:57 -0600, The Daring Dufas

I use two metal soup cans and over 20 miles of string between them. I hear my data one byte at a time, write it down, and wait for the next byte. When I get all the bytes, I have to punch them into punch cards and put the card into a punch card reader. After half a day, I get a printed black and white photo of someone. This high technology is real amazing. I hear someday they will run that string across the ocean. I'm not sure why, but I bet it's so we can listen to fish talk to each other.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/12/2012 6:29 AM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Dang! You don't have a telegraph in your area yet? Darn Western Union, those people need to get off their rumps! O_o
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 12 Nov 2012 09:56:39 -0600, The Daring Dufas

You didn't get your Obamatelegraph?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/18/2012 11:15 AM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzz wrote:

I be still waytin on mah winmil an soler sells an den mah Chevy Volt. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 12 Nov 2012 03:14:11 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Grounds are not supposed to be daisy-chained (neither are neutrals).

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 18 Nov 2012 12:14:40 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzz wrote:

You can chain a neutral through a device unless it is a multiwire circuit. There is no rule at all about grounding conductors beyond
"Electrical equipment and wiring and other electrically conductive material likely to become energized shall be installed in a manner that creates a low-impedance circuit facilitating the operation of the overcurrent device or ground detector for high-impedance grounded systems." If the device manufacturer provides 2 screws, you can chain through that device. It is common to see the ground looped through the single screw and continuing on to the next one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 18 Nov 2012 12:36:57 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I didn't say that it wasn't to code. OTOH, it's terrible practice. An inspector I had would have failed me for using both neutral screws. He probably would have condemned the place had I daisy-chained grounds.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/11/2012 7:13 PM, Nate Nagel wrote:

My guess is that if you replace the receptacle while the circuit is live you break the ground downstream. The same is true of the neutral. You can have a "hot" neutral or ground downstream. A hot neutral is not likely to be a problem (except for the person changing the receptacle). A hot ground, even for a short time, can be fatal.
For multiwire (Edison) circuits you are not allowed to connect the neutral through the receptacle. It has to be spliced separately, and a single neutral wire connects to the receptacle. If replace the receptacle hot, and break the neutral, one downstream leg-to-neutral can wind up at 240V and the other 0V.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 11 Nov 2012 18:48:13 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

This one did, but was only used to connect the outlet ground lug to the outlet box.

The thought of dissimilar metals seems like a sure miss to me (for a dependable connection). And the fact that a nail used to hold the outlet box to the stud is never going to be dependably tight--the box gets pushed and pulled every time something is plugged in or unplugged. Especially when the studs are soft redwood.
When I wired up my garage, I put 2x4s spanning between studs, and screwed the boxes to those. None of those boxes are wiggly at all!

It works long enough to get paid for the job, anyway.

In this case, the separate, bare ground was wrapped around the nail used to mount the box to the stud. This couldn't have been done post-construction, as there is no evidence of the sheetrock having been disturbed, and the nail is otherwise innaccessible.

And have a direct connection from ground to the recepticle, as opposed to chaining the ground thru the box (says this untrained homeowner).
Copper to steel still sounds like a questionable technique to me, even tho I know it is still the most common (only?) way of grounding steel boxes. The slightest bit of moisture.... And if you live near the ocean?
--
croy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.