Panasonic cordless drills are just dumb?

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Someone hasta keep the the motorologically impaired gimps in the limelight.
nb
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re: "Who is so stupid as to want a screwdriver slower than that?"
Anyone who uses a screwdriver for other applications than building decks.
Of course, that doesn't make the user stupid.
I don't want my screwdriver to *always* be slower than 100RPM, but I certainly want the option of having it *start* at less than 100 RPM.
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== They are "variable speed" and can be run at any RPM you select within the range they are designed for. You can't be very observant or are totally incompetent or both. ==
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Roy <wilagro hotmail.com> wrote:

You appear to be suffering from a reading comprehension problem. Panasonic cordless drills run at no less than 100 RPM in low gear and no less than 350 RPM in high gear.
I have nothing against Panasonic, but I keep running into that stupid attribute of their drills, and it just seems crazy. No other company in the world designs Their cordless drills to prevent running at slower than 100 RPM, because it's a stupid idea. That is just plain stupid, there is no other description.
Only a Panasonic fanboy could love a drill like that.
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Mine will turn much slower. It will barely move at the lowest setting. Mine is a 15.6V, but perhaps other sizes are different.
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This is an advantage, how? What point is there in having a drill that turns slower? Howzabout 50 rpm? One revolution per second slow enough for you?
Wait! I do have one electrical device that turns at exactly 1 rpm. It's my friggin' clock!!
nb
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wrote:

Very slow can, at times, be a help starting a screw with no pilot hole. Once you go about 4 turns, it makes no difference at all.
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In my reality, less than 2 revolutions per second IS "very slow" and I'm so old, I'm almost carbon dateable. I guess as a one-time machinist and someone who grew up using drill motors before the apparently now can't-do-without variable speed control, I don't understand why someone needs speeds slower than the orbit of the moon around earth to start a drill. Silly me.
No wonder manufacturing has been moved off-shore. Even "semi-skilled" appears to be an unattainable goal by our younger generations of drug addled dolts.
nb
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notbob wrote:

If your tools are as old as you are, I'm sure you don't understand the improvements that have been made. When cordless impact drivers came out a lot of people said what the heck do I need that for, and when shown a demo of what they can do promptly said I'll take one. The same happened with auto dark welding helmets. You can do complex contouring using a rotary table and a manual mill, but why would you when CNC is cheap and available? You can cut steel plate for your project with a hacksaw, but why would you when you have a plasma cutter? Times change, technology both improves and becomes more affordable.
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I'm no luddite. I HAVE two battery drill motors. But it's stupid to try and start a "1/2+" drill bit in steel plate without a starting point of some kind (spring center punch and center drill ring a bell?), no matter how slow you can start the bit. Yes, I've done it, drilling steel strap brackets and steel cabinets for earthquaking with a 1/2" bit in a 1/2" drill motor, but it was neither easy nor fun and I consider approaching it that way a total hack. You can extoll the approach all you want, but it's just plain poor practice. Gimme two drill motors and the right tools and I'll smoke ya' every time.
nb
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notbob wrote:

I guess you don't do any drilling in thick / structural metal, otherwise you would know that 100 RPM is over the top speed for larger drill bits like 1/2"+ in thick metal like 1/4"+ steel.
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I'm a machinist. I also have an old all-metal Milwaukee 1/2" hand drill motor with one speed, 400 rpm. Anyone who uses ANY hand drill, with or w/o variable speed, to drive a half inch or larger drill bit in 1/4" steel w/o first driving a pilot hole or using a mag-base is a complete moron and a hack and deserves the broken wrist/hand/arm they will eventually sustain.
nb
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notbob wrote:

Funny, I'm a machinist as well. My Makita cordless had no problem at all drilling 1/2" holes through 3/8" steel plate without a pilot hole. I did try the first one with a 1/4" pilot hole and found it simply took twice as long to get the final hole done with no benefit. I've got two Bridgeport mills in my shop as well and both go down below 100RPM. I do have a Milwaukee Hole-Hawg that is not variable speed, however it's two speeds are slow and slower.
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Neither speed being < 300 rpm. Besides, that long handle give more control than a Makita battery drill motor. Of course the Bridgports have speeds slower than 100 rpm, but yer not holding 'em in yer hand, are you.
Feel free to do as you wish. This man's momma never raised such a fool.
nb
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Smitty Two wrote:

Yes. My Makita has no problem at all drilling a couple dozen 1/2" holes through 3/8" thick steel brackets on a charge.
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*Exactly* 1 RPM?
Wow, that must be a really expensive clock!
Cesium beam controlled, perhaps?
No, wait, even the so-called "atomic clocks" need to be adjusted from time to time (no pun intended)
*Exactly* 1 RPM? That must be some friggin' clock!
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John Doe wrote:

Hmmm, That is not a variable speed? Mine is. and reversible direction as well.
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Tony Hwang <dragon40 shaw.ca> wrote:

All of Panasonic's current cordless drills do not allow RPM of less than 100 (no less than 350 in high gear). It has been that way for years. And that's the way it is.
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