Panasonic cordless drills are just dumb?

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Why on earth would anybody want a cordless drill that starts at no less than 100 or 350 RPM?
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Use it as screwdriver?
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Who would want a screw driver that starts at 100 RPM?
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Because its durable and holds up when you throw it at a wall because it stripped your screws and you are pissed? Because you like the name panasonic? Because life isnt perfect?
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John Doe wrote:

Beware of all things mastuSHITa (parent company of Panasonic and others)...
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Beware of stupid posts!
A coarse thread 3-1/2" deck screw has approx 28-35 threads. At 100 rpm, that's a minimum of just over 15 secs to drive one screw. Who is so stupid as to want a screwdriver slower than that?
nb
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On 5/5/2011 8:29 PM, notbob wrote:

IMHO, a cordless is the wrong tool for production use on high-torque applications. I have a cordless 24v B&D, and love it for small light-duty jobs, but it doesn't do deck screws and similar chores worth a damn. It did great with short drywall screws, and when I had to shoot a couple hundred self-tapping panel screws putting my shed back together after a tree fell on it, But after about 4 3.5" deck screws when changing out some rotten boards, I ran out and bought a real corded drill with a lot more torque. (I had smoked my previous corded drill, an el cheapo B&D 3/8, drilling wiring holes through 40 year old framing that was hard as a rock.)
--
aem sends....

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wrote:

Why do people use cordless tools on a deck when there is almost alwys an outlet no more than ten feet away? Cordless tools are made for situations where there is no electricity, or in places where the cord is a big hassle, like on a roof. And unless you have a top quality commercial cordless, you're only asking to destroy the drill on 3.5" deck screws. Even a cheap corded drill has a tough time with those screws.
Last year I bought a small deck from someone who moved their mobile home, and sold the deck. It was only a few years old and in good shape. It was put together with deck screws. I tried to dismantle it using a cordless drill (no power was available). None of my cordless drills could remove the 3 to 4 inch deck screws. Using a screwdriver was even tough. I got a trailer and a few friends to come over, intending to just lift the whole deck on the trailer. One guy brought a very costly cordless drill, and I was surprised that it did remove some of the screws, but his battery went dead at about the 8th screw, and the battery had been fully charged. We loaded the whole deck on the trailer in one piece. When I got it home, I did some modifications to it, and had to remove some screws. Even a small corded drill had to struggle, but my big corded drill worked fine. Once those deck screws are in the wood for awhile, they are almost like someone glued them in. I guess the wood expands from weather.
One other thing. Some years ago I was overloading a cordless drill, and the battery literally exploded. Apparently it overheated. My hands, arms and face were cut when chunks of plastic flew from the battery. Someone else nearby also was hit and cut. No one was seriously hurt, but it was unexpected and it hurt, and could have been worse if a piece had gone in someones eye or something.
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On May 6, 5:19am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I have an 18v sears cordless that has a lo/hi gear selector. I use it pretty regularly to drive screws including deck screws with the low setting. It does pretty well even on the 3 1/2" and 4" ones. But if I have a lot to do I will get out the corded drill. I agree that any situation where you have a lot of repetitions and power available it's better to use corded tools. But you can't be the convenience of the battery ones when all you have to do is a few things.
Better question is why would you buy a power tool from a tv manufacturer?
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On 5/6/2011 8:44 AM, jamesgangnc wrote: ...

Same reason one might buy a railroad locomotive or jet engine from a company that makes home appliances????
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Or healthcare equipment from a company that leases airplanes?
(GE)
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Because its the best? I have owned or used DeWalt, Bosch, Ryobi, Craftsman, and Porter Cable cordless drills. My all time favorite is my 15.6V Panasonic. Nice weight, size, balance.
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One word; Bosch. I have DeWalts, PorterCable, and Makita. None hold a candle to the Bosch, both 12V and 18V varieties.
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On May 6, 5:19am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

re: "Cordless tools are made for situations where there is no electricity, or in places where the cord is a big hassle, like on a roof."
I can't recall a time where I needed to pull out my corded drill because my DeWalt cordless coudn't handle the task. I've build/rebuilt decks, docks, sheds, cabins, and houses.
The only time I use my corded drill is when I need a hammer drill.
re: "One guy brought a very costly cordless drill, and I was surprised that it did remove some of the screws, but his battery went dead at about the 8th screw, and the battery had been fully charged."
That doesn't tell us anything about cordless drills in general. I had a Dewalt a few years back where the batteries were shot. "Fully charged" meant nothing from a usage-time perspective. They would die after a very short time under minimal loads. Of course, they would charge up again in a very short time so I was never without a battery, but what a pain.
Unless someone else had a "very costly " (what does that mean?) cordless drill that also used up a "fully charged" battery after only 8 screws (really?) then it's very possible that the drill/battery was the problem, not the use of a cordless drill in that situation.
I wonder how many contractors out there still use a corded drill on an everyday basis, determined by whether electricity is available or not.
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notbob wrote:

Impact drivers are far far better at the task than a drill/driver. As for drill RPM, my Makita and Hilti drills both start from near zero RPM and quite often those low RPMs are needed when getting a bit started properly on center, getting a screw point started, etc. Again remember matsuSHITa and run the other way with any of their brands.
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Are you retarded? All drills start from "near zero". In fact, I feel I can say wihout fear of contradiction they ALL start from EXACTLY zero.

A bit? As in drill bit? Anyone not properly center punching a starting point in metal or can't start a drill bit in wood at less than 2 revolutions per second should put the tool down and go play with some fuzzy toys in the rubber room.
Are you really this stupid or are you getting shots?
nb
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notbob wrote:

The reference is to the lowest driven speed on the variable speed trigger. Quality drills will start and run at very slow and controlled RPMs. The noted matsuSHITa drill jumps from zero to 100 RPM+.

Low RPM centering is generally required starting the Hilti hammer drill on concrete. Center punching metal is an extra step that required significant extra time handling other tools and is entirely unnecessary in many cases if you have a quality drill and know how to use it. Starting drill bits in wood is pretty easy, but starting long screws in hard wood requires low RPM initial drive to keep the drive bit properly engaged while the screw point is getting started and the screw is unstable.

Im not stupid, but either you are or you're just trolling.
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Funny, I was gonna say the same of you.
You've yet to present a single situation where less than 2 revs per sec is too fast for anyone with enough skill to hold an electric handtool w/o maiming themselves or others unless they are crippled, retarded, or spastic.
nb
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notbob wrote:

I most certainly did, and everyone else read it troll.
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notbob wrote:

Congrats! You hit the non-PC trifecta: crippled, retarded, and spastic!
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