painting the outside of a house

I'm not gonna start now, but I'm just kind of planning it out for next summer.
Anyway my house undoubtedly has about 4 too many coats of paint on the siding. I'd like the change the color as the original owner chose some horrid purple/brown color.
Should I remove the previous coats, and how do you do this? Do you use a stripper first, or sandblaster or scraper. For something the size of a house, what method is used that is reliable and condusive to a good finish paint job.
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Eigenvector wrote:

No sandblasting please. There are tools to mechanically remove it and there is chemical methods. What is best depends on many factors including the type and condition of the siding, type and condition of the paint etc.
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Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

...and type and condition and value of the surrounding landscaping.
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I would only remove all the existing paint if it were in serious shape with major peeling problems. Otherwise, you power wash, scrape, prime bare spots and paint. It would be ideal in many cases to remove the existing paint, but it's a long, expensive, time consuming job that no one wants to go through unless absolutely necessary.
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ATTENTION possible LEAD BASED PAINT HAZARD! your community may have rules like no power sanding etc.
Painting a frame home is a every 6 to 8 year job, have you considered vinyl siding?
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Ehhhh, vinyl siding doesn't sound attractive to me right now. Maybe after doing all that work to paint the house it will, but for now I like wood and the flexibility it give you.
I'll inquire about the lead stuff, I didn't think about that.
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On Mon, 4 Sep 2006 08:44:08 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm,

I prefer a heat gun for areas I can, methylene stripper where I can't. ScotchBrite sands both surface remnants smooth afterward.
It might be quicker, cheaper(?), and a WHOLE lot easier to reside.
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A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
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Eigenvector wrote:

What is the condition of the existing paint? If it's not blistering or peeling, you might want to consider leaving it alone. Gently wash to remove dirt and chalk, let dry thoroughly, and paint over it to change the color.
How old is the existing paint? I recommend you read the following link:
http://www.historichomeworks.com/hhw/qa/qa07.htm
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Thanks for the link. In this case the existing paint is about 1/4" thick. I just don't feel comfortable painting over it as I suspect the wood may even be pretty nice looking under all that crappy latex.
Sounds like I have a LOT of thinking to do here.
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On Mon, 4 Sep 2006 08:44:08 -0700, "Eigenvector"

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wrote:

Honestly I don't know what the board material is, if I had to guess it is cedar, but its in long tapered boards about 12 to 18" wide
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On Tue, 5 Sep 2006 18:39:45 -0700, "Eigenvector"

siding down to bare wood. It is extremely time consuming to do yourself and very expensive to have done. I've yet to see one that didn't leave gouge marks or lots of spots on the ends that have to be taken down by hand. The usual method to repaint your house would be to power wash first, then sand out any rough spots with a rotary sander. Spot prime any bare spots with a slow drying oil based primer. Apply an acrylic primer tinted a shade lighter than the finish coat then apply the finish coat. FWIW YMMV
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Obviouslt the OP hasnt owned a frame house very long.
NEWW owners tend to want to make it PERFECT, after 5 or 10 paintings they just want to get the @#%$ job done as fast and cheap as possible, realizing no matter what its tempoorary:(
Vinly or alunimimum siding is a much better investment unless you live in a historic home or such........
I HATE repetive jobs, want my home as maintence free as possible.
you may fnd that quarter inch of paint hides a multitude of troubles like rotten boards held together by paint and body filler
A friend stripped all thew trim on hos old brick home and did a beautiful job, took a whole summer.......
It got back all the detail of his trim.
Trouble is the stripper neutrailzer didnt work and much off his new paint is constantly peeling off.
He has stripped again and sandsblasted areas that still peel. he has spent 10 YEARS screwing around and just recently announced next summer it all alunimum trim for him.
He tells a funny story.
One day he saw his neighbor painting and yelled over looks good.
His neigbor said its white:)
Now he understands it a enmdless project..........
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