Painting Sheet Rock.

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This is Turtle.
I just got a carpenter to finish a bay window area and there is about area of about 4 sheet of sheet rock to paint and it has been finished and floated and new sheet rock.
1] What kind of paint to start with to prime the sheet rock and everything will be off white?
2] The carpenter recommended condora something paint but I like Benny Moore type paint but what brand is the one to use?
Thank You in advance !
TURTLE
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TURTLE wrote:

area of

floated and

everything will

Benny Moore

This from the Benjamin Moore site on priming: http://tinyurl.com/3spf8
Two coats of finish paint will be the minimum. Much more durable and will even out the wall surface better so you won't see the joint compound (banding).
Consumer Reports had very good things to say about California Paints. Very good performance and price: http://www.californiapaints.com /
In paint, the expensive stuff is the pigment. This is also what gives the paint body and coverage (as in covering another color paint so you don't see it). More pigment, higher price, better paint. The material cost is the least of it in painting. Don't cheap out on the paint.
R
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This is turtle.
Is the Latex Primer a good word to ask for what I want ?
Sorry I know nothing about painting sheet rock.
TURTLE
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wrote in message

This is Turtle.
Thank you there.
TURTLE
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On Wed, 6 Apr 2005 21:35:46 -0500, "TURTLE"

They sell a primer for everything. Outside I use them, on an interior wall, I just paint it. I personally like Lucite brand paint. I think any name brand paint should work fine indoors. Just avoid the cheap no-name generic stuff, or you might end of doing 3 or 4 coats, and that stuff drips all over the place . On new sheet rock, I'd give 2 coats of quality paint.
Just my opinion.
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I like Ben Moore also. Just a coat of latex primer and one or two of the finished color and you are all set. IMO, any of the better brands will do a good job. I've tried some cheaper ones and did not like the results. B. Moore, Pittsburgh, Sherwin Williams, the better Sears grades have all worked well for me.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/




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Yes, every paint store has it. There are other primers for special uses over stains, but with new work you don't need any of that.
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

The idea is that new plaster soaks up paint like a sponge. So, give it some cheap latex rather than spend big bucks for some top shelf paint. "Primer" is just that, cheap latex. It's not special.
After the primer, use good paint. I've had good results with Benjamin Moore although it is expensive. Sherwinn-Williams was very good years ago but we were not pleased with it when we used it about 10 years ago. Behr from Home Depot seems to do just fine. [Maybe there is only 2 or 3 paint factories in the world and all paint comes from one of them regardless of the label!]
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On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 23:01:05 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

And that includes some "name brands", like Ralph Lauren's paints. They made the only red I liked but it took *7* coats to get it uniform, not including the primer (which I should have tinted... I usually do). It was the thinnest latex I've ever used.
http://www.magpie.com/house/photos/diningroom/jan10.jpg
Steve Manes Brooklyn, NY http://www.magpie.com/house/bbs
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wrote:

This is Turtle.
Thanks for the Help on the Painting of Sheet Rock. The Thoughts on the brands and websites was very helpful.
TURTLE
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uniform....
Steve, was that red paint in an ultra deep base?
I've done a lot of colors in ultra deep bases -- they all cover well, in 3 coats max. But the reds in ultra deep are murder.
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A specific primer for bare wallboard works, but typically I use some of the finish coat for priming.
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TURTLE writes:

You must mean gypsum board. "Sheet Rock" is a brand name for a portland cement board product that hasn't been made for a long time.
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Just use the paint you're going to use, and give it 2 coats.

If you just shop by brand you'll never get it right. You shop by paint type, not brand, Benjamin Moore sells high quality paint and they sell cheap paint. Same for Sherwin Williams, and all the big companies.
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Nonsense. All pigment is added to the base can, regardless of color or amount of pigment added, for free. The expensive part is the acrylic, and 100% acrylic paint will always be more expensive. If you buy the base white or add a bunch of pigment to it, it's the same cost.
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It soaks up cheap paint like a sponge. And we're not talking about plaster, we're talking about drywall.

Cheap primer is cheap. And there's usually not much sense in using it. Good paint has high solids, which is what you want in a drywall primer anyway. Just put on a couple coats of good paint and forget the primer.

No it's not. Only expensive BM is expensive. Cheap BM is cheap.

There is no such thing as Sherwin Williams paint. That is a brand. You don't paint with a brand, you paint with a specific product. You probably don't have any idea what Sherwin Williams paint you even used.
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Some reds will take 4-5 coats no matter what paint you use. Some reds are almost clear, that's just the way it is.
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Primer Kilz Or Zinsser water base For on areas that do not like water zinsser bin shallac. Top coat any major brand that will match color of existing paint. Primers can also be tinted. S
On Wed, 6 Apr 2005 21:35:46 -0500, "TURTLE"

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Most of us here know what he's talking about. Saturday must be "nitpicking day" in your neck of the woods.
Rudy
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

portland
It's still made, it's not made from portland cement but primarily gypsum, and it's called Sheetrock. Nobody was confused by the terrapin's term.
http://tinyurl.com/3tsv4
When someone cuts their finger and starts yelling for a Bandaid, do you say, "Well that's a brand name and we don't have any of those. Would you like an adhesive bandage instead?" Or do you just go and get the damn bandaid?
R
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