Painting over poly

The previous home owner sponge painted my kitchen. They put what appears to be a clear coat of poly to protect their masterpiece. I would like to repaint the room. Can I paint over poly? Do I sand it first? Do I need to prime First? I am guessing that the poly has a satin finish.
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I did this last year. Sanded first with fine paper. Check from a million angles with a halogen light to be sure I hadn't missed any spots. Primed with Kilz, painted with latex. Worked fine. The floor's still ugly, though. :-)
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Hey Joe:
Got some poly I need to paint over. Assumed I would have to use oil base primer. Was the Kilz you used the stinky oil or latex? If latex, how long has it been up?
This is the inside of one of those crank windows that swing out. Temp difference in mid winter between outside and inside can be as much as 100 degrees.
Of course, I'll be using exterior on it.
Thanks
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Just checked the can and it's the latex Kilz. Painted over it with Devoe high gloss latex enamel. This is an area behind the kitchen counter and around the stove. It doesn't get a LOT of splatter, but it gets some, and it gets wiped down with a sponge and a little Dawn dish soap about once a week. No ill effects so far. BUT: I was able to paint the area just before going on vacation for a week, which according to MY painting bible (in my head) is the right curing time for many paints.
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clipped

Painting over "poly" should be no big deal. It has to be clean, free of gloss, dust and grease - same goes for any coating. Kilz is just a brand name. Don't know about water based "poly", but latex paints have more flex than oil, so that is the tendency (after poor prep) that makes oil not a good coating to put over latex. Oil is harder, less flex. I would wash and degrease it very well - use solvent where there is really gummy grease - vacuum up all dust and then use the primer with label uses for your paint. If there are stains, then a stain-blocking primer should be used. Bullseye makes 'em. Kilz makes 'em. Lotsa brands. I will never use paints from the box stores - tried it once, just in case the publicity was accurate. It was crap. Ben Moore and Sherwin Williams are my guys :o)
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I know. It's just what I had around, and will for the next 300 years. The prior owner of this house did a great job of cleaning paint can rims and making sure they were sealed well. Then, he left 8 cans here when he moved, each at least half full. I would've called him & asked if he wanted any of it, but he's across the country.
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I just set a calendar reminder and will get back with you then :-)

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On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 08:33:48 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

It's probably a glaze made especially for sealing a Faux finish. I typically light sand with a 200 grit to give it some tooth then prime with BIN or an equivalent pigmented shellac primer. Indoors you can't beat them for adhesion to problem surfaces. Top coat with your choice of finish.
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