Painting my paneling....how much primer?

I am in the process of painting a room in my house that has somewhat dark paneling. I have primed the whole room and then went back with a brush and carefully went down each groove to make sure there I didn't miss any spots. Well, the areas I re-painted with the brush look nice and white, but the areas between the groove (where I just used a roller) isn't as white. It's all covered, of course, but you can still see some darkness coming through the primer. Do you think this will be noticeable when I start painting it with a good latex paint? The new color is "baked biscotti" (you gotta love the names they give paint these days) and it's a kind of green (I think).
I hate the thought of having to put another coat of primer on this, but I want to do it right the first time. Thanks for any input...
Mike
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Mike wrote:

Primer makes paint stick to the paneling. You do not need another coat of primer. However, you will probably need two coats of paint over the primer. Repeat after me: "primer is not paint. primer is not paint. primer is not paint."
Bob
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Bob wrote:

Okay, here it goes:
"Primer is not paint. Primer is not paint. Primer is not paint."
I feel better already. Thanks for re-assuring me. Looks like I'll start putting the "baked biscotti" up tonight.
Mike
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Mike wrote:

And ... let me suggest, besides the (1) primer coat, planning on (2) finish coats. Keeping the first one moderate to light in thickness. (Don't try to force one coat to cover.)
Sounds more like linguini than biscotti. :')
J
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If it's the same kind of old panelling I had.... the grooves were rough finish and the "panels" smooth finish. The rough grooves absorbed more paint/primer so I had to do go over them with a thin brush before the final coat to get it even. Or you might want some slight color definition so it still looks like panelling?? snipped-for-privacy@sme-online.com wrote:

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...

Biscotti is usually a toasted color, sort of a goldish brown. If you leave it too long it will get moldy and turn green. If your paint is green check to see if it tastes either like pistachio or mold. If the first, continue to apply. If the second, get a new batch.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I put up the first coat last night. "Baked Biscotti" turned out to be a warm gray. Whodathunkit?
Thanks again...
Mike
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I'd a thought you knew what color you picked and not just a name..... hmmmmmmm.
--
Steve Barker


"Mike" < snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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Steve Barker LT wrote:

Hello?? I'm married. You think I had anything to do with the color selection? ;->
Mike
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:I am in the process of painting a room in my house that has somewhat :dark paneling. I have primed the whole room and then went back with a :brush and carefully went down each groove to make sure there I didn't :miss any spots. Well, the areas I re-painted with the brush look nice :and white, but the areas between the groove (where I just used a :roller) isn't as white. It's all covered, of course, but you can still :see some darkness coming through the primer. Do you think this will be :noticeable when I start painting it with a good latex paint? The new :color is "baked biscotti" (you gotta love the names they give paint :these days) and it's a kind of green (I think). : :I hate the thought of having to put another coat of primer on this, but :I want to do it right the first time. Thanks for any input... : :Mike
I'm wondering why you are painting paneling in the first place. I had a LOT of paneling in my house and instead of painting it I decided to remove it and paint the walls that were underneath it. Most of it is removed now, but there's still a bit more.
Dan
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wrote:

In my business I've seen a lot of paneling that was glued to drywall by someone who apparently getting construction adhesive free and was determined to use it up. Removing it would have essentially destroyed the drywall. Sometime painting the paneling is the most cost effective method of redecorating. I've also seen paneling up over studs with no drywall underneath. I agree with Dan that removal is the best method if it can be done with a minimum of damage to the drywall.
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NickySantoro wrote:

Yeah, I've seen paneling glued up. It's the same kind of thinking that leads idiot builders to hang wallpaper to bare drywall. Just a big dam labor-intensive mess.
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i really LIKE the look of painted paneling................ i suggest that you NOT skimp on the primer!
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On Fri, 21 Jul 2006 15:05:59 -0400, NickySantoro
:wrote: :
:> :>:I am in the process of painting a room in my house that has somewhat :>:dark paneling. I have primed the whole room and then went back with a :>:brush and carefully went down each groove to make sure there I didn't :>:miss any spots. Well, the areas I re-painted with the brush look nice :>:and white, but the areas between the groove (where I just used a :>:roller) isn't as white. It's all covered, of course, but you can still :>:see some darkness coming through the primer. Do you think this will be :>:noticeable when I start painting it with a good latex paint? The new :>:color is "baked biscotti" (you gotta love the names they give paint :>:these days) and it's a kind of green (I think). :>: :>:I hate the thought of having to put another coat of primer on this, but :>:I want to do it right the first time. Thanks for any input... :>: :>:Mike :> :>I'm wondering why you are painting paneling in the first place. I had a :>LOT of paneling in my house and instead of painting it I decided to :>remove it and paint the walls that were underneath it. Most of it is :>removed now, but there's still a bit more. :> :>Dan : :In my business I've seen a lot of paneling that was glued to drywall :by someone who apparently getting construction adhesive free and was :determined to use it up. Removing it would have essentially destroyed :the drywall. Sometime painting the paneling is the most cost effective :method of redecorating. I've also seen paneling up over studs with no :drywall underneath. :I agree with Dan that removal is the best method if it can be done :with a minimum of damage to the drywall.
In my case, there wasn't any drywall under the paneling. It was a gamble removing it because I didn't know what I would find, but I finally decided to start removing it and see what I'd find. The house was built in 1913, so there's a lot of plaster and that's what I found under the paneling. Usually it's not too bad, but like the rest of the plaster in the house, a lot of it needs repairs. Anyway, the old paneling was pretty dark and removing it lightens up the place and gives it a better mood right off the bat even before begining plaster repairs and painting. On top of that, I've found uses for most of the old paneling.
Dan
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I painted over mine because it was 1/4" paneling with no drywall underneath. Removing it would have meant removing & reinstalling cabinets and installing new drywall and trim, plus the electrical boxes would be recessed too far. Just wasn't worth the trouble.
Bob
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