Painting Glossy Wood Panelling With Latex

In the past I have prepped wood paneling with something with a name like "liquid sandpaper" - very strong smelling, and I am sure quite toxic. I followed with latex paint, and the results were successful.
Now I have cleaned some fifty-year-old oak paneling with "Sunnyside Gloss Remover," which smells much milder. I was disappointed to read in the instructions that it should be followed with one coat of oil paint before using latex paint.
Any opinions as to whether I should risk it with latex, or perhaps clean again with a stronger agent?
Thank you in advance!
Dwight Gibb
(I always use a mask for organic vapors, out of my conviction that the manufacturers are trying to kill you while making a profit....)
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| In the past I have prepped wood paneling with something with a name like "liquid sandpaper" - very strong smelling, and I am sure quite toxic. I followed with latex paint, and the results were successful. | | Now I have cleaned some fifty-year-old oak paneling with "Sunnyside Gloss Remover," which smells much milder. I was disappointed to read in the instructions that it should be followed with one coat of oil paint before using latex paint. | | Any opinions as to whether I should risk it with latex, or perhaps clean again with a stronger agent? |
You didn't mention the finish. If it's polyurethane the liquid sandpaper should work well, but yes, it should be primed with oil primer before using water-base. If it's factory-coated paneling then things like sanding liquid are unlikely to have an affect. I'd still prime with oil, but acrylic paints stick much better than they used to. Most companies also make a smooth surface water-base primer, for use on glass, enamelled metal, etc. If you don't want to use oil paint you might check into that primer.
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On Tuesday, February 16, 2016 at 5:36:18 PM UTC-8, Dwight Gibb wrote:

Dear Mayayana,
Thanks so much. What a precise and clear answer! I took your advice and went with the primer for glossy surfaces, which I had not known about.
Best,
Dwight
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| Thanks so much. What a precise and clear answer! | I took your advice and went with the primer for glossy surfaces, which I had not known about. |
You're welcome. I haven't used the primer much, but I did use it once on a mirror and it seemed to work well. And I've noticed that even "plain" acrylics seem to stick far better than they used to. It used to be that paint on my hands would dissolve if rinsed, in most cases. If not it would peel easily. With current wall paints I find I need to scrub it off if I wait more than a few seconds.
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