Painting doors? ? ?

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I've been painting doors for years, and have never solved the problem of how to prevent the edges of the doors from sticking to the jambs -- resulting in an ugly mess.
In my experience I'd have to leave the doors open for several days in order to get a good cure.
I know there must be a solution to this problem.
What is it?
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Ray Jenkins wrote:

I suggest two things. First make sure you use a low blocking fast drying paint and second a hair dryer.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Ray Jenkins wrote:

Waxed paper
-- dadiOH _____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.0... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico ____________________________
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I never tried wax paper but I have my doughts, but using a scraper and removing the lip that develops on edges from paint will work. You are basicly removing the paint so it fits as it did when new. Now if you have a weather strip you are sol unless you remone the weather strip, usualy not an option. Its best to plan on not closing it for 12 hrs.
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Are you talking about exterior doors?

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Are you by chance using water based paints? I ask because I notice when painting interior walls that for weeks/months afterwards if a broom or some such thing is left leaning against the wall for a few hours, it tends to stick.
Don't know if oil based paints exhibit this characteristic or not?

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No top quality paint will exhibit that habit, unless it was applied incorrectly, or cured at the wrong temperature. Sorta like the paint in my apartment, which was sprayed on at 40 degrees before I moved in.
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clipped

coat of cheap latex on anything and everthing every year. I obsess about prep (I HATE THE PREP WORK), find all the dents, globbies, brush marks, cracks, etc., then obsess about cleaning, priming and painting because I don't ever want to paint this room again. :o) Usually works.
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I'm that way, too. Didn't use to be. When I first bought my house, my wife, who has the same "what's on sale" disease as her mother, went out and bought some $12 per gallon crap from Sears for a simple room painting project. 3 coats later, we still saw the old color. Went to a local hardware store which sold a brand I don't remember - premium stuff like Martin Senour, $28 per gallon. End of story. We never went back.
The guy also gave me one of the best money-saving tools I've ever had: A "key" that hooks under the paint can lid and pries it open without damaging the seal. Paint lasts a really long time if you don't f..k up the rim of the can. :-)
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clipped

They should hand out strips of tin foil with the key. Lay a strip over the rim after you gently pry off the cover so's when you pour paint, the rim isn't full of paint. I always pour so that the paint runs down the side a little bit and covers the paint color mixing code :o)
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for about $.50 at the paint stores, they sell small pour spouts that attach to the rim that solves this. when dry, the paint just peels right off.
they also sell paint in square plastic screwtop jugs in some places. seems to me that's the best idea yet. i don't know why more places don't do that.
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On Tue, 20 Apr 2004 07:49:55 -0700, "Charles Spitzer"

This idea sucks royally: getting ALL the paint out of these containers is a pain if the screwtop lid is stuck on. I prefer the old-fashioned cans.
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Dude, it's PAINT, not freaking super-glue. You don't even have to be smarter than the lid, just bigger.
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wipe off the threads before putting the top back on?
store upside down so air can't get to the paint in the lid so it won't dry hard?
use a pipe wrench to take off the lid?
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I'm in FL where anything made of metal rusts eventually and if it's stored in the garage - like paint cans - it happens very quickly. Wish they would make heavy plastic replacement lids for paint cans. I did buy some metal replacement cans with a hole in the top made out of plastic with a plastic plug. That is a big help - but all plastic would be better. You could wash it and reuse it on other cans.
Dorothy
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you can buy some brands of paint in plastic containers. however, the lids are still metal i think.
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....and they may not be the brands you want to buy. How about storing paint cans inside lawn & leaf bags, along with a bag of silica gel, sold in boating supply stores for absorbing moisture in storage areas? Gun shops sell similar stuff, too.
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Craft stores also sell it, dries flowers.
On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 03:02:43 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

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Lurker wrote:

I know what you mean...flat latex is OK but the glossier you get the worse it gets. And to answer your question, no oil doesn't do it. Assuming the paint/varnish has dried for a couple of days. Which is why I always use oil base paints on wood.
-- dadiOH _____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.0... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico ____________________________
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dadiOH wrote:

And to answer your question, no oil doesn't do it. Assuming the paint/varnish has dried for a couple of days. Which is why I always use oil base paints on wood.

I agree - when cured, oil base semi-gloss has a lot harder surface than latex. In addition, the next time painting is needed, it is impossible to sand latex - it wants to roll up and peel off. As for painting doors, a few coats of paint will build a considerable amount of volume to the size of the door. Take it down to bare wood if it is a close fit, prime, paint, and leave it open until well set. Before painting, look at least at spots where the paint has worn away - good clue that it is already in need of sanding down in spots.
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