Painting Clapboards

Hi,
In the midst of having new Cedar horizontal clapboards being put on house.
They are pre-primed (with something ?) on both inside and outside.
Questions:
a. Not really "dirty", but guess I will have them pressure washed first. Good idea ? Anything I should probably know first about pressure washing Clapboards ? e.g., can it ruin or take off the primer ?
b. Have no idea how long Cedar clapboards may have been sitting around in lumber yard. Should I wait some period of time for them to "stabilize" (or perhaps bleed-out) before the painting (latex paint) ? If so, how long ? Sure do want to get them painted this summer, though.
c. If not necessary to wait, how long should I wait after the pressure washing for the surfaces to be satisfactorily dry, etc. ? (assume typical 75 deg. summer days) Will a day or so be enough if dry to the touch ?
Thanks, B.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why wash them if they're not dirty?

No. Pressure washing will force a lot of water behind them. Probably damage the boards as well -- cedar is pretty soft, and abrades and splinters easily.

Yep. Main thing you need to know is, "don't".

Doesn't really matter.

If they've been primed properly, you don't need to worry about that.

That's simple: don't pressure-wash them. Especially if they're not really dirty. Rinsing them off with a garden hose should satisfy your urge to wash them. Wait a day or two to paint.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

I'd agree except I would take a small portion and wash w/ bristle brush and wipe to see how much (if any) affixed dirt is removed. I'd judge from that how much scrubbing (again, if any) is needed. All you really need is to be sure there's not a layer of grime that isn't solidly adhered so the paint eventually peels off w/ it...pressure washing imo isn't the best way to do that, in agreement w/ Doug.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert11 wrote:

term, the primer may be chalky, which would require cleaning for proper adhesion. Retail primers I have checked advise painting within a couple of weeks. I would check the mfg. instructions to see if you need another coat of primer. I would also prime ends of the boards and caulk them prior to painting - that is where you are most likely to have paint peel later on if the ends are not sealed up tight.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Put your little toy pressure washer back in the garage until you need it for some real chore, like your cousin Vernal's ATV after he's back from the swamp. Meanwhile, take the time to learn the nuances of painting a valuable wood from the pros at a real paint store, not the 18 year old that works at the box store. You may be amazed to learn that oil based primers and paints can last longer than latex (although those clever paint chemists are full of suprises.) Actually, a little grime will not harm a primer, so don't waste your time going for a pristine substrate. Some other good tips are in the posts on this thread, too. HTH
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.