Painting Brick Home

I live in a brick home that is 75 years old. I have had to replace masonry several times due to deteration. None of the repairs has matched the original masonry.
I thought maybe painting the house would help seal the old masonry and cover the redone masonry. I practically like all of the painted brick homes that I have seen.
What is the best method of painting brick? It is a two story house so I don't plan on doing the job myself but would like to make sure the paint contractor does it right. Help would be appreciated.
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W. Wells wrote:

Don't do it. Think about how it is going to look when the paint starts to peel and it will. Then consider what it will cost to remove the paint. That will be really big dollars and really messy.
Consider having the patches done properly if necessary and then doing a cleaning. It will cost more than paint in the short term, but be far cheaper and IMO far better looking in the long term.
--
Joseph Meehan

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going to be painting every few years, masonary breathes, causes paint to peel.
its hard to sell a painted brick home, because of the added maintence cost involved....
so net less oney at home sale time...
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I agree. If I were home shopping, I'd pass one of these by without even getting out of the car.
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In NC some people actually buy brand new painted brick homes.

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Maybe they're "painted" with an epoxy like someone mentioned earlier.

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Perhaps some but the one I saw looked like a simple spray job judging by the overspray. I would think that you'd be more careful with epoxy because it is expensive and unremovable.

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wElLcom two thu nu aMurica. Some pigs seem to think they can lower their work standards because they only need to compete with the Chinese.

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W. Wells wrote:

I have seen very few of these done right, and those that looked reasonably good were done with 2 part epoxy coatings or Imron. It was due to the ability to get rid of graffiti off an Imron surface that one building in the city was done this way.
Rob
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Don't do it. Think of the variation as adding charm to an old house.
Don <www.donwiss.com> (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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wrote:

....or hire a mason who knows how to match the color of the old mortar.
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Mortar can be stained.
wrote:

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After application? I've heard of coloring it before, but..after?
wrote:

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Yeh there are guys who stain mortar to match properly the rest of the house. Nothing you can do with non matching bricks though if that is the problem.
wrote:

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Such is life.

Yeesh.

Elect not to? Once brick is painted, you've lost its low maintenance features and created just another surface that needs to be apinted regularly.

CHeck on the number of people asking how to remove paint from brick and how hard it is. If you don't like the look of your brick, consider getting siding put over it or something else that is removable at a later date.
John
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house, so you should do what you want. I do have some ideas, though.
What about staining the brick? It should give a more uniform look to the entire house. It won't be a perfect match, but it might allow the brick to breath, and I *think* it would have less a chance of being nasty looking. Anyone in the industry know if this is possible?
What about faux painting *only* the repair bricks to make them match the majority of the house?
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flip
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better to vinly side over brick, at least it never requires repainting
for all the costs painting your home every few years its likely cheaper and better to get all the masonary repointed. at least its a one time expense..
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On 22 May 2006 11:22:36 -0400, Philip Lewis

In Colonial America, painted brick was a sign of wealth and status.
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