Paint Type Question

Hello,
Live in New England. Just had the house re-sided with the typical Cedar horizontal Clapboards.
Had them use pre-primed on both sides (oil primer apparently) siding.
So, I thought the rest is simple; right ? Just get a few quotes from painters for putting on two coats of the best Latex paint that Benj. Moore has. Thought it would be so simple.
Anyway, two of them said that I absolutely don't want Latex Paint, as it will probably peel in a few years, and that what "most folks" are now using is: "100% Acrylic Latex Stain (& Wood Protector)"
I never heard of this product.
He did open a can of it to show me, and the stuff really looks thick; just like paint.
To me, a stain was something that always had to seep into the wood, and on the thin side. Obviously, this stuff couldn't thru the primer on the siding that is now there.
Is this what "most folks" are now using ?
Does it just sit on the primer, or... ?
**What are the pros and cons relative to just Benj. Moore regular Latex paint, please ?
BTW: he likes California for this stuff ? If we do go with it, California the brand to use ?
So, pros and cons, and what would you do please ?
Thank you very much.
Bob
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Robert, go to the paint manufacturers' web sites. They have great tips and instructions and you can "ask the experts" especially for local concerns. Not that there aren't any experts here, it's just that I think as the manufacturers they have more knowledge and testing about their products over more scenarios. For example, are you near the ocean? That might change everything might do with painting a house.
good luck

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edee em wrote:

to look at Cabot stains if you are going the stain route.
Cabot srt of "grew up" in New England.
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Go to a reputable paint store and ask the difference between paint and stain (and between pigmented and non-pigmented stain.)
When working with genuine cedar boards, reputable siding craftsmen use (if anything) only stain, never paint.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

treated lumber. If you paint it, why buy the expensive stuff?
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net says...

Why does painted pressure treated lumber knot your panties? Ya gotta do something with it, it and looks like hell by itself. My deck and porch railings are painted PT. The deck itself is (solid) stained PT (the porch is carpeted).
My house is mostly cedar (I've replaced most of of the crap pine that was there) and stained with a solid stain, which might just as well be paint. Don't see why that should upset you either.
--
Keith

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krw wrote:

it doesn't need to be pt or cedar or anything else fancy. Just a simple issue to ponder :o)
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net says...

Nonsense. Paint isn't a perfect covering and unprotected PT is a disaster waiting to happen. Have you ever seen painted wood in contact with the ground? Does paint stop a carpenter ant or termite? How about uncoated PT left out in the weather? Again, nonsense!
--
Keith

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clipped

Termites don't eat paint, and all of the many carpenter ant problems I have seen were in dead or rotted wood. The OP asked about siding, which I would not put in contact with the ground. Don't know how cedar compares, price-wise, with any other siding, or whether other woods are available for the same style of siding. My question remains...why choose cedar if you are going to paint it? If you are going to paint it, you seal it up tight and keep it that way.
PT doesn't last forever, and, for sure, should be the choice to put in the ground. I'd dip the bottom in tar first because bugs will get into it eventally. Could probably do as well with non-PT? Takes about 2 years here for termites to get into PT.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net says...

So have I; all rotting.

Nonsense. Why do you think treated wood is used?

You use cedar because it naturally resists pests (PT does the same "unnaturally"). It doesn't resist sun or water, so must be protected. Paint works.

Nonsense.
--
Keith

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krw wrote:

PT only delays the inevitable....eventually, in or on the ground, termites will probably invade without any other barrier. Carpenter ants, at least around here, do no infest sound wood.

Precisely. Now, back to the point I have been trying to make. Weathered cedar is pretty, long-lasting. But, if you cover it with paint to protect it from sun and weather, why not use less expensive wood if you intend to keep the paint in good shape?

about, not something you think you know about.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net says...

Delays for *years*. Ants, termites, and other critters really don't like the taste of copper and arsenic.

Because cedar is *NOT* naturally weather resistant. If left unprotected the sun and water will get at the lignin and it'll come apart. You really do need to put something on it to protect it. Paint is one of the options. Even if both are painted/stained/whatever, cedar will outlast pine or such.

You are obviously ignorant of the entire subject if you think termites will eat two-year old PT. There really isn't much hope for you.
--
Keith

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clipped

I know termites have eaten two year old PT....one of many curiosities in my own back yard. I didn't see you there, though, so hang on....there may be hope for me, dope.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net says...

Yes, apparently you are a dope.
--
Keith

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I've been a painter for 20 years, west coast of Canada, although my first choice would of been 2 coats of oil stain, now that it's primed that choice is gone. I would put two coats of B Moore's best acrylic paint over now. Acrylic stain will stick to almost anything as good as paint, eg. metal flashing, plastic dryer vents etc. but why use a product that was meant to soak in as something that sits on top.

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primer is for painting on the second step.if you got oil based primer,use oil base paint.
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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That's what I've been told. Modern latex paint protects against UV better than oil paints and sticks well to oil primer (which in turn adheres to wood better).
--
Keith

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If the contractors who suggested stain actually saw the house, and all the primed wood, you can cross them off the list forever.
Most folks around here are using paint on cedar siding. I can't remember the last time I put latex stain on a house. [Oh, and yes, stain would just sit on top of the primer, like paint. May as well use paint.]

Uh, no. As mentioned, latex finish over oil primer is just fine, and typically preferred. And using oil exterior on siding is something noone wants to do.
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