paint stripper question......

my earlier post i recieved alot of good onfo on what to use to stripper a dresser....
and now i have another question.... has anyone in here used a product called citrus strip? if so is it any good?... reason i am asking is the people at home depot said it would be good to use since it doesnt have a chemical smell o it.
any help would be appreciated...
thaks in advance
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On 8/8/2005 7:44 PM or thereabouts, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net appears, somewhat unbelievably, to have opined:

It's usually not a good idea to paint a stripper unless she gives you permission first. She may decide to charge you with assault & battery.
What?
I misunderstood the question?
Nevermind.
--
As a child, my parents thought I was an idiot-savant.
Now, however, it is rather clear that I\'m simply an idiot.
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It works, it does smell if citrus, if you are in a closed space it can get kind of strong. It is not fast, you have to wait hours for it to work, but if it dries out all you ahve to do is spray water on it and it activates it again. Redi Strip works same as citra strip but it has no smell at all. Both are slow because they have taken all the haserdous chemicals out of them.
Larry>
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I've used Citristrip to remove polyurethane (?) from kitchen cabinets. I don't remember it taking hours, more like 30-45 minutes. One application to get rid of most of the coating, and a lighter subsequent application to remove residue. Don't know/remember how well it works on paint. This was 3-4 years ago and the polyurethane was in poor condition, so that may have been a factor.
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This stuff is weak. I prefer to use the harsh stuff.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

My experience is that the more environmentally friendly strippers work slower, and therefore are left on the workpiece longer, and subsequently have more time to soak into joints and start removing glue. I've had pieces start to fall apart on me when using citrus strip.
Normally I prefer less toxic things in general, however, for paint stripping I almost always use the toxic methylene chloride strippers because they seem to do the best job. I either use it outdoors, or else if I use it in the basement, I have a strong fan exhausting the fumes.
One tip I'll add: If there are many layers of paint that need to be removed (as opposed to just a thin layer of clear finish), I start by removing a lot of the paint with a heat gun and scraper to reduce the amount of finish that has to be chemically stripped. But then you have to worry about if it's lead paint, and that's a whole 'nuther topic itself.
Ken
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Citristrip works much more slowly than standard strippers and by a different mechanism. The citrus smell goes a long way and gives me a headache after a while even in well ventilated conditions.
Citristrip is an NMP based stripper. It works by dissolving the finish rather than releasing it from the surface as methylene chloride does. That's why it is slow. It is fairly safe because of its slow evaporation rate but it is on the expensive side. I found I still had to solvent wash the pieces I have used it on after removing the stripper.
As far as a "chemical smell", all "smells" are from chemicals. Some are more toxic than others and some are more pleasant than others but they are all "chemical".
Good Luck.

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