Paint Question

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I am going to hire a painter to paint the outside of my house. The house i s stucco. One estimate was from a man who uses Sherwin Williams but the ot her two were from men who uses Behr. One offers pressure washing with mold /mildew remover, a sealer and two coats of Behr Premium Plus. The other pr essure washing with mold/mildew remover, one coat of Behr Marquee. (The Ma rquee is said to include a sealer). It was not on the market when Consumer Reports tested paints last year -- and named Premium Plus the best paint. I am a little reluctant to rely on Marquee -- it costs more and hasn't bee n around long enough to know how well it will hold up. The painter using i t thinks I'm being silly. He and the other painter (Prem.Plus fan) have bo th been in business about 25 years.
Just wondered what you'll thought. This is a big expense so I don't want t o screw up. Thanks.
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On Thursday, December 19, 2013 1:48:08 PM UTC-5, Dottie wrote:

other two were from men who uses Behr. One offers pressure washing with mo ld/mildew remover, a sealer and two coats of Behr Premium Plus.
Don;t know about the sealer step, sounds like that may be specific to stucco. I would read the paint can label, go to their website, etc and see what they say needs to be done to use it on stucco.
The other pressure washing with mold/mildew remover, one coat of Behr Marq uee. (The Marquee is said to include a sealer). It was not on the market when Consumer Reports tested paints last year -- and named Premium Plus the best paint. I am a little reluctant to rely on Marquee -- it costs more a nd hasn't been around long enough to know how well it will hold up. The pa inter using it thinks I'm being silly. He and the other painter (Prem.Plus fan) have both been in business about 25 years.

My concern wouldn't be with the Marguee paint, it would be with only applying one coat instead of two. Behr paint has been highly rated, right up there at the very top with Benjamin Moore. I'd rather have two coats of that product, instead of one coat of the product that is their premier Marquee paint. The two products are probably fairly similar, while two coats versus one is a big difference. Price factors in too. How different were the price quotes?

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Dottie wrote:

in it's name! Do you suppose "great advances' have been made in the paint industry in the last year? I feel more confident that the people putting on 2 coats are concerned about the quality of their work. It takes More Time to apply two coats. It might be funto ask the 2nd painter, "Don't you think it would look better with 2 coats?" : ) Good luck with your work!
Bill
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Dottie wrote:

Here's a good website about painting a house: http://www.howtopaintahouseright.com/ .
It's by a guy named John Burbridge and the videos are worth watching.
He also has a paperback book, "Watching Paint Dry", that I bought and have read 2/3 of so far. It's an easy read, and the first part of the book was particularly interesting to me -- it's about how exterior house painting jobs get botched up. He was on a painting crew whose job it was to go back to botched house painting jobs to "fix" them as part of the guarantee from the original painting company. The main problem, in most cases, was improper cleaning, scraping, and preparation of the house before painting it. There is also a website called
http://www.askthebuilder.com/ and his main pitch in all of his articles about exterior house painting if good preparation and, in particular, actually physically washing the house with a brush and not just pressure washing the exterior.
(The second half of the Watching Paint Dry book is a little less interesting to me since it is mostly about painting stories and personality issues between painters, and between painters and bosses, on painting job sites.).
I don't know the answer regarding which paint would be best for you to use.
I got estimates one time for painting the exterior of a house that I own (not stucco), and the estimates ranged from $3,500 plus paint to $15,500. So, get a number of estimates.
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TomR wrote:

Sorry about the formatting and extra spacing between the lines in my original reply. I don't know why my posts sometimes show up that way, but it usually is when I include cut-and-paste website links.
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I'm sure gladI don't live wherever you do. I had my (stucco) house painted about three years ago. The footprint is about 5400 sq.ft. plus both sides of a 7' x 65' wall plus both sides of a 24" x 70' knee wall. Labor was $1600 for PW and paint one coat. He did two coats in a couple of areas.
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On 12/19/2013 4:49 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Mine cost $1700, included my detached garage, was two coats, used Sherwin Williams and was done about ten years ago.
OP: If the one coat Marqee painter won't do two coats, then ask him if he'll guarantee the work for x amount of years. Otherwise, I suggest going with one of the other two or get more estimates.
BTW, ask all painters if they have a guarantee/warranty.
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On Thursday, December 19, 2013 5:50:03 PM UTC-5, SBH wrote:

She can ask, but I wouldn't rely too much on a guarantee. If the paint has problems, there's probably a 50-50 chance at best that you'll get a painter to actually honor it. More likely they'll give excuses, that it was the condition of the house, not their fault, etc. And even if you sue them, you probably can't collect against the ones that are gonna do a crappy job anyway because many of them are judgement proof.
And if they do give a guarantee, it better be in writing and read the details before hiring them, not after there is a problem.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I agree. The book that I read that I mentioned earlier spent a lot of time explaining how the "guarantee" worked. He was on the guarantee crew that had to go out a fix bad paint jobs. He said most were not fixable because they had to do with poor prep before painting. So, all they did was scrap some and slap some more paint on to try to placate the customer, but never fixed the problem.
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dadiOH wrote:

I live on the East Coast of the U.S. -- New Jersey.
The estimates that I got were for a 2 1/2 story detached single family home with old-style aluminum siding and an open wood "overhang"(?) of about 20 inches on all 4 sides; and a detached 1-car garage with wood siding. I had everything painted white -- walls, trim, etc. -- so no complicated cutting or multiple colors etc. Plus, no shrubs, plantings, etc. around the house to worry about. They spray painted most of it. And, I picked the $3,500 estimate and they did it in 2 or 3 days at the most.
Shortly before that paint job, I had another 2 story, 4 BR, 2 bath, colonial style home with attached 2-car garage painted. That one had asbestos siding and was painted one main color and separate colors for trim (white) and doors (green). The company that painted that one did it for $3,000 (including the paint). They mostly spray painted it and did it in 2 days. That house was bigger and more complex than the job on the other house above that I described. But, the company that did the colonial for $3,000 gave me an estimate of something like $4,800 for the smaller 1-color house, so I didn't use them.
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Has the house been painted before? If so and the paint is well adhered there should be no need for sealing.
You need the power wash to get rid of crud, mildew, loose paint, any chalking. If you wind up with substanrial bare stucco, spot priming is in order.
If they spray paint they also need to back roll it.
IME, one coat is generally satisfactory. Two definitely would be.
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wrote:

re-colour it. I forget what it is called, but it is NOT paint. Alegro Cement - aka Fog Coating appears to be what I was thinking of. Can't be done over paint (at least not with total reliability)
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On 12/19/2013 4:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

In the south, construction is often stucco over concrete block and it seems to get painted.
In the north, construction is stucco over wood frame and all the recommendations I have heard are to "redash" the stucco - basically a thin coat of stucco (done by a stucco contractor). (Fog must be similar.) Stucco is a pretty maintenance free product and paint turns it into a much higher maintenance surface. If you have a house that does not have a good vapor barrier (older houses) the paint has to 'breathe', or water vapor that is migrating to the outside will be stopped at the stucco. That can rust out the metal lath.
As clare wrote, you don't redash over paint. (Sand-blast the paint off first.)
You could try asking a stucco contractor for recommendations.
I would ask manufacturers for paint recommendations for stucco. Not obvious to me that a good paint for wood would be good for stucco.
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On Thursday, December 19, 2013 1:48:08 PM UTC-5, Dottie wrote:

other two were from men who uses Behr. One offers pressure washing with mo ld/mildew remover, a sealer and two coats of Behr Premium Plus. The other pressure washing with mold/mildew remover, one coat of Behr Marquee. (The Marquee is said to include a sealer). It was not on the market when Consum er Reports tested paints last year -- and named Premium Plus the best paint . I am a little reluctant to rely on Marquee -- it costs more and hasn't b een around long enough to know how well it will hold up. The painter using it thinks I'm being silly. He and the other painter (Prem.Plus fan) have both been in business about 25 years.

I bookmarked those web sites so I can go back and read what the author said about washing the house. The house has been painted before -- it was buil t in 1983 and we bought it in 1991. We painted it after living here about 10 years. The man I will probably hire said he used two coats of paint and that he back rolled the paint where he sprayed it on.
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On 12/19/2013 05:38 PM, Dottie wrote:

Is the paint oil-based or Latex?
When me and my buddies painted houses to put ourselves through college we generally recommended Latex...but ONLY because it was easier for us to deal with. Oil-based paint is superior.
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That hasn't been true for at least thirty years. Oil-based paint will adhere to wood better because it penetrates the fibers better but latex is more UV resistant. An oil primer with latex top coats gives the best of both worlds.
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On 12/19/2013 07:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Well , we only did one stucco house and we used napp rollers and Latex.
That was 40 years ago
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On 12/19/2013 07:53 PM, philo wrote:
http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/113302
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Dottie wrote:

Sounds like a good plan.
Any chance that you could post what range of estimates you are getting, what style house it is (to give an idea of the size and scope of the job), and where in general the house is located?
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