paint problem- mismatch


Please excuse if this is a repost. The first didn't go thru.
Bought 4 gallons of Home Depot (Behr) latex paint for some room painting.
I used roller and edge tool to paint the first room. It looks great.
However, on the second room, the part where I used the edge tool shows up lighter that the walls where I used the roller. Different gallons were used, but mixture was the same.
What would have caused this? The paint is completely dry now.
Thanks.
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Thinner application, you could probably hide it by feathering out some additional paint with an all but dry brush from the edge of the trim well past the area covered by the edge tool. It's a PIA but you can get decent results.
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Oh yes and next time box your gallons together in a five so that any differences there are eliminated.
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The wife bought a gallon of paint at Lowes and then went off to a friend's cottage, leaving me to paint a room - but that's a different story. ;-)
Anyway, it took about a 2/3 of the gallon to put on the first coat, so I figured another quart would be enough to put on the second coat. I took my 1/3 gallon of paint with the formula label on it (key point) so they could mix the extra quart in to ensure a better match.
Off I went to Lowes and the first thing the paint guy (Glen) asked me was which Lowes I had bought the paint at. He said that the formula tag on the lid wasn't marked with the machine it was mixed on, so it didn't come from his store. (As it happens, my wife had bought it at a different Lowes.)
When people come to Glen for additional paint, he always mixes it on the same machine because there can be different results from different machines. He also mentioned that different base lots and different colorant lots can also make a difference. So that could explain your differences in colors. Anyway after 2 misses, Glen got the color right.
OK, so why were there 2 misses? Listen to this:
It was actually one of Glen's helpers (a rookie) that mixed the paint. She entered the color name into the computer, grabbed a quart of base and stuck it under the machine. Just before she poured it into the gallon I yelled "Stop!" I noticed that my gallon said Satin, her quart said Flat. Thinking it was a rookie mistake, Glen came over and checked the formula tag. It said Flat, not Satin. So it seems that the Lowes my wife went to entered "Flat base" into the computer but actually colored a Satin base.
So Glen, taking over the project, enters the name of the color into the computer, tells the computer it's a Satin base and grabs a quart of Satin. Just before he poured it into the gallon I yelled "Stop!". I could see from where I was standing that the color was different from what I had been working with all day. Glen compared the formulae on the labels and found that the formula for the same color *name* was different for a Flat base than for a Satin base. He even printed out the formula tags for each and they were certainly different.
So, it's back to the computer, enter the color name, tell the computer that it will be a Flat base, but use a Satin base instead. The result matched what I had in my can.
Here's the last interesting piece of the story. After Glen told the computer he was going to use a Flat base, but then scanned a can of Satin, the computer popped up an error window - what he told the computer (Flat base) didn't match the base he had just scanned. He had to override the error to continue. He (and I) couldn't understand how the guy at the other Lowes could have mixed the paint without getting the error and starting over.
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wrote:

The wife bought a gallon of paint at Lowes and then went off to a friend's cottage, leaving me to paint a room - but that's a different story. ;-)
Anyway, it took about a 2/3 of the gallon to put on the first coat, so I figured another quart would be enough to put on the second coat. I took my 1/3 gallon of paint with the formula label on it (key point) so they could mix the extra quart in to ensure a better match.
Off I went to Lowes and the first thing the paint guy (Glen) asked me was which Lowes I had bought the paint at. He said that the formula tag on the lid wasn't marked with the machine it was mixed on, so it didn't come from his store. (As it happens, my wife had bought it at a different Lowes.)
When people come to Glen for additional paint, he always mixes it on the same machine because there can be different results from different machines. He also mentioned that different base lots and different colorant lots can also make a difference. So that could explain your differences in colors. Anyway after 2 misses, Glen got the color right.
OK, so why were there 2 misses? Listen to this:
It was actually one of Glen's helpers (a rookie) that mixed the paint. She entered the color name into the computer, grabbed a quart of base and stuck it under the machine. Just before she poured it into the gallon I yelled "Stop!" I noticed that my gallon said Satin, her quart said Flat. Thinking it was a rookie mistake, Glen came over and checked the formula tag. It said Flat, not Satin. So it seems that the Lowes my wife went to entered "Flat base" into the computer but actually colored a Satin base.
So Glen, taking over the project, enters the name of the color into the computer, tells the computer it's a Satin base and grabs a quart of Satin. Just before he poured it into the gallon I yelled "Stop!". I could see from where I was standing that the color was different from what I had been working with all day. Glen compared the formulae on the labels and found that the formula for the same color *name* was different for a Flat base than for a Satin base. He even printed out the formula tags for each and they were certainly different.
So, it's back to the computer, enter the color name, tell the computer that it will be a Flat base, but use a Satin base instead. The result matched what I had in my can.
Here's the last interesting piece of the story. After Glen told the computer he was going to use a Flat base, but then scanned a can of Satin, the computer popped up an error window - what he told the computer (Flat base) didn't match the base he had just scanned. He had to override the error to continue. He (and I) couldn't understand how the guy at the other Lowes could have mixed the paint without getting the error and starting over.
The identical thing happened to me. By the third trip to Lowe's I was livid. I asked for the store manager and led him to the paint counter. I explained the situation (of the paint not matching) and demanded resolution. He asked who did the mixes on each batch and it was the same guy, fortunately. He paged another gentleman who knew the likely place to look for the problem and it was just as you said.
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More on Lowes inept paint service:
A couple of years ago I bought some plastic shutters at Lowes - a maroonish color.
I took the shutters to the paint counter and asked them to mix up a quart of exterior trim paint to match.
The guy stuck the corner of the shutter into the paint matching system to determine the formula. He mixed up 2 different non-matching quarts until he finally gave up, telling me that the paint matching system sometimes has trouble with the darker colors.
I then took the shutters to a *real* paint store - a small, locally owned chain. They guy behind the counter grabbed a stack of miniature shutters (about 2" tall) and found one that was a close match to mine. He entered the formula from the back of the shutter into the magic machine and mixed up a quart. We compared the paint to the shutter and it was a little too purple. He took the quart back the mixing machine, added a smidge of this and spritz of that and - Ta Da - a perfect match.
He made it look so simple. He said the guys at Lowes only know how to do what the machine tells them to do and have no expertise in making minor color adjustments when needed.
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I would suggest that not even on the same machine can you get an exact match, but generally you get very good matches. That is why you should never use two different mixes on the same service WITH OUT mixing them. Mixing eliminates the problem. I would also suggest that there is going to be a different appearance between a rolled surface and the typical edger surface. In fact, there will usually be a small difference between two different people rolling a wall.
Those differences are very small and usually no one notices them, but they are there.
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Global warming. That is the root cause of all our problems.
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