paint prep - scrape or burn?

I need to paint the clapboards on our dormers. The paint is oil-base, ~20 years old. After I scrape and sand, I can often still catch an edge of the scraped area, and pop off another small-ish patch of paint. That it 'pops' makes me wonder if it's not really well-bonded to the wood.
So, I'm thinking I should get down to bare wood, at least in some areas. I'd be happy to be talked out of that.
Thanks
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wrote:

What I've done in that situation is loosely scrape all that easily comes off, and cover with new paint. After 20 years the paint that will loosen has done so. You can use a latex filler to mask the edges if you think it's necessary for cosmetics. For smaller stuff I take it all off.
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On Monday, July 14, 2014 9:45:57 AM UTC-4, George wrote:

I wouldn't take it down to bare wood. I use a Wagner Paint Eater, which IMO, is awesome. It's like a grinder with a hard version of one of the mesh nylon things you'd clean pots with. Takes the paint off and doesn't clog.
Then use Peel Bond as a primer. It's thick and helps level out the areas where you transition from bare to old paint. It won't fill it in completely, but one or better two coats will even it out a lot and if it's up high, it will look fine.
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Do you have a carborundum blade scraper? That will make the job easier. If you want to burn it off you'll need to be very careful about not burning the wood. It seems like overkill to me, especially given that modern paints don't last the way they used to. So you'll probably be back up on that ladder, anyway, in plenty of time to get the new peels. :)
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On 7/14/2014 6:45 AM, George wrote:

A true story! Years ago when we lived in Portland, OR, the family went shopping one Saturday morning. We saw a neighbor up on a scaffold using a propane torch and a scraper to remove old house paint.
About 3 hours later we returned home and passed that house, this time with lots of fire trucks in front and the house with no roof and steam coming from the ceiling insulation.
Burning to loosen the paint is not a good idea!
Paul
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On 7/14/2014 9:45 AM, George wrote:

If you decide to burn the paint off, please have the fire department on your property, with charged hoses and hydrant connection active. Does not sound safe.
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On Mon, 14 Jul 2014 18:52:12 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Not to get off track here, but give me a break. I'm using a heat gun. Back in the day, we stripped whole houses with blowtorches. You just blister the paint a little, and then scrape it off. I'd say we did at least half a dozen houses that way, though the lead fumes ... what was I talking about?
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On Mon, 14 Jul 2014 07:42:47 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

Yeah, I have one like that. But, these dormers are mostly corners. Plus, that thing has so much torque, I think it might pull the ladder over. (Joke)
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dont create a lead hazard! So dont sand scrape ONLY and collect all the scrapings!
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edge

That

areas.

Same thing here this past weekend, so I remember every stinking thing about it.... First and most important, turn on the radio loud enough so that if anyone wants to give you something else "more important" to do, they at least have to walk over.
I repainted the south 7x14 ft side of a plywood shed. Last painted 15 years ago. Put down something to catch the chips and paint -- much easier now than later. Scraped the loose paint off, but did not force any that had stayed bonded to the wood. LOTS of scraping. Then used about half of a quart can of indoor/outdoor spackle to fill in cracks, holes. After dry, used a $2 3x5 inch sanding sponges, one each 35 & 80 grit, to sand the fillers and rough spots - much easier for me than an electric or hand sander. I like the fact that it's flexible, easy to use. than Let it dry, hosed it down to see where it needed more, and went over it one more time. Used a coarse roller which left an orange peel texture and covered up most of the blemishes.
For paint, Sherwin Williams was my first stop, but theirs was $40-80/gal. Evidently this store is more of a contractor supply than retail. They have a 40% off sale coming up Friday if anyone is interested, but I needed to get the job done that day.
Home Depot guy only could tell me to pick it out and it was all $30-40 a gallon, but was no up to speed with paint. Also, they have a 1 gallon minimum, and I only needed a quart of a 2nd color.
Lowes guy was knowledgeable and good at explaining the different qualities of paint. I got the middle of the road quality $28, and with 2 coats ended up with 1/2 gal left for a later project. They mixed up a quart of another color for $12.
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