Paint over linoleum

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I have a very small bathroom and the linoleum floor looks horrible. Rather than replace same I was wondering if I could paint over it. If yes, what kind of paint to I use and anything else I need to know. Thank you , Monika
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I don't know about painting the floor, but the cost would most likely be the same.
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It's difficult to get paint to adhere to linoleum. It is also difficult to get paint to stand up to the wear it experiences on a floor. The cost/work to overcome those obstacles far outwieghts the effort to just lay a new piece of linoleum.
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If the existing lino is neither cracked nor peeling, you could even lay new right on top of the old... if anything this will give a slightly better insulated and softer floor than taking the old up and laying down new. Please do at least pull the toilet though...
n
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A lot of it has raised features. If so it will telegraph through the new.
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True, I didn't think of that. My mental picture was of a typical sheet that you roll out that only has a slight texture. If it's not like that ignore my suggestion.
nate
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wrote:

Even the slight texture will come through in time. I've done quite a few vinyl over vinyl that came out absolutely fine. You just have to skimcoat it first with like Henry Skimcoat.
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You have to pull up the quarter round anyway. Skim coating it is about as much work as pulling it up unless the prior installer went crazy with the glue. And I like to use the old piece as a guide to cut the new one when doing bathrooms.
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Can't say I buy into that. Not in my experience anyway, Clean the vinyl with ammonia/detergent, rinse well and skimcoat (yea ya gotta mix it and can't screw around putting it down), A little sandpaper can smooth any errors you made and you have a nice surface with no old glue to deal with. The skimcoat is basically only in the recessed pattern.
Guess the bottom line is whichever method works for you.
And then there's really bad ones that you just have to put down flooring underlayment (not plain old luan). Now were talking screws, glue, skimcoat, ughhh!
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I like to use the old piece as a guide when cutting the new one.
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Brown paper template made from the 35/36" rolls works for me. Same idea as stone countertops I've seen patterned by pros using like a mylar or something.
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I like to use the old piece as a template for cutting the new. Leave a little extra though as sometimes vinyl shrinks.
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On Tue, 5 Oct 2010 09:27:46 -0400, "purpledawn"

Far easier and about the same material costs to just put down new vinyl. Paint over linoleum would not be at all durable, either.
For a small bathroom, you can often find a nice vinyl flooring remnant that is big enough for VERY cheap. They usually have these rolled up and displayed in a barrel in the flooring department of big box stores, with their dimensions written on a tag.
A one piece vinyl floor is VERY easy to keep clean.
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On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 07:53:41 -0700, Smitty Two

Sheet flooring for a SMALL BATHROOM is definitely a DIY project, that could be handled by anyone who was contemplating painting the same tiny area. The stuff is very easy to work with, and there are many sources in print and online on how to do it.
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On 10/5/2010 11:11 AM, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

that have mastered it. My few attempts over the years produced rather sad results. I have the theories and procedures in my head- no problem. But my hands can't seem to put theory into practice. Other than maybe a tiny room, and some of that no-glue stuff where the baseboard holds the edges down, I'll never try it again. And for damn sure, I'll never try patching sheet goods again. THAT is artisan work, to make the patch vanish. As long as I have cashflow, and can find a moonlighting guy who works cheap for cash on evenings and weekends, I'll hire it out. That is what I did on my second bathroom, and he made it look EASY. In and out in a couple of hours (one evening to put down the underlayment and mud the seams, next evening to lay the vinyl), and $75, and it looked better than I could ever do. If I ever feel rich enough to replace my worn-out kitchen vinyl, I'll try to hunt the same guy down.
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On 10/05/2010 06:39 PM, aemeijers wrote:

I dunno, my mom 'n' dad did two bathrooms in their house and it looks at least as good as it would have had they hired a pro.
Not sure why they didn't do the third, honestly. Carpet in a bathroom is a cardinal sin IMHO. (and it's been in there for something like 20 years now...)
nate
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On 10/5/2010 8:27 AM, purpledawn wrote:

of polyurathane on it. It is holding up amazingly well. I suspect you could use latex of your choice and put on several coats of floor finish over that. The worst that can happen is it starts to come off and you have to do something else.
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Thank you for all your answers. Guess I will hire someone to lay new linoleum.
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purpledawn wrote:

Option A: If your hand fits: * A wrench, * A utility knife, and * A spatulata You can do it yourself.
Option B: Know a bachelor with a tool kit? He'll probably be eager to trade a vinyl-floor lay for a rack of lamb dinner.
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It's not very hard to do.
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