Paint ? Latex walls and oil on woodwork?

I have having the interior of my home painted.
Some of the quotes, actually the higher quotes, listed an option for the doors trim and woodwork to be done in oil based paint. The cost is the same.
The ceilings and walls will be done in latex.
Wanted to know what the pros and cons were going with oil?
Would it make sense to have the kitchen and bathroom walls oil too?
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alt.home.repair:

Everyone has different opinions about oil versus latex. My opinion is that oil is a lot of trouble, smell, and mess, and it has a heavier ecological impact. I don't use oil unless it has a feature I want.
I use oil for: + Ceilings where the popcorn is falling off, but the client doesn't want to remove it. They wind up with shiny ceilings, because oil-based paint only comes in gloss and semi-gloss. + Trim, because glossy trim looks really good, and oil-based paint flows well and hides the brush marks. + Covering water-based stains. + When the client definitely wants it and I can't talk them out of it. + Situations where latex paint won't stick. This doesn't happen much, because, for the most part, you can make any paint stick to any other paint with the right preparation.
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Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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Steve wrote:

And satin/eggshell, matte and flat. Maybe some other sheens too depending on who makes it. You can always use flatting powder to get any sheen you want out of glossy/semi-glossy.
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dadiOH
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alt.home.repair:

Interesting. I've asked at several paint suppliers, and they've always told me that oil paint only comes in gloss and semi-gloss. The latest was Sherwin-Williams. Maybe the clerk needs training.
I'll have to check out flattening powder.
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Steve wrote:

Powdered talc works OK, used to be used by paint stores. Check epoxy supply places to find it.
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dadiOH
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Tube Audio wrote:

Grab the option...you will have a finish that is smoother, no/fewer brush marks, harder, more scrubbable, easy to sand to prep to repaint.
IMO, no wood should ever have latex/acrylic on it. _____________

Depends if you want the above. If not, use semi-glossy acrylic. Or - if you like shine - glossy.
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Tube Audio wrote:

The only way to go, IMO.

Yes.
Harder, tougher finish. Easier to clean. Less apt to stain. Latex on doors, trim and woodwork is horrible to repaint - can't sand out little dings because the latex rolls up like rubber (although it isn't actually latex :o)

I always do, have never regretted doing so. Kitchen, especially, requires more cleaning and sometimes tougher solutions. I've seen special "bathroom" paint, and I don't know what is special about it. Alkyd is more impervious to moisture. Easier to clean.
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