Paint - How Much to Buy

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On Friday 25 January 2013 20:17 Doug Miller wrote in alt.home.repair:

Not at all - it has been my experience that the coverage figures need halving (approximately) on nearly every paint I have every applied.
This is not because it is crap and needs 2 coats - this is beacuse I don't roll it out to atoms thick like the manufacturer assumes.

No - 5 times as much with crap paint, because you'll need to double the number of coats as well!
Example:
Dulux Paint - a very good UK consumer[1] brand - the coverage abilities are excellent - 1 coa over a similar colour of existing paint, 2 coats over anythign else, including new plaster (OK, there is a "mist" coat as well, but that's a given).
Dulux "Once" - surprisingly it usually does actually cover in one coat with a change of colour. However, even this, the coverage figures on the can leave a *lot* to be desired...
[1] which means it's more forgiving of mishandling, but also because it happens to be easy to buy, being popular
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On 1/25/2013 3:52 PM, Tim Watts wrote:

That is pretty much what my experience has been, and I tend to roll it quite thin.
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It's not fair to blame the manufacturer's labelling when the actual problem is that you're applying too heavy a coat. :-)
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On Friday 25 January 2013 23:22 Doug Miller wrote in alt.home.repair:

Except I'd like to actually cover the grubbiness underneath ;->>
I know the manufacturers assume I will be painting a perfect white wall...
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If the wall is soiled, it needs to be washed; stains that can't be washed off need to be covered with a stain-killing primer.

No, they assume you will be painting a properly prepped wall.
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On Saturday 26 January 2013 00:01 Doug Miller wrote in alt.home.repair:

I said "grubby" (what you get on an ancient wall after a good wash), not "Texas Chainsaw Massacre".
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And if there are stains on the wall that cannot be washed off, you need to cover them with a stain-killing primer before applying the topcoat. The manufacturer's coverage claims are based on the assumption that the paint will be applied over a properly-prepared surface. If you don't do proper surface prep before painting, it's not the manufacturer's fault that you have to apply more paint to cover the flaws.
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On Saturday 26 January 2013 14:51 Doug Miller wrote in alt.home.repair:

I'm sorry but that is not true.
Certain stains should be treated with a stain block - particulary oil or flue-tar seepage on masonry unlined chimneys and old subsequenty fixed roof leaks can cause staining on ceilings that is water mobile (ie bleeds through paint).
For day to day grubbiness [1], once the wall has been washed off, it is completely normal and reasonable not to do any special treatments before painting.
[1] Obviously any waxes (kids crayons), oil (from cooking or dare I say, hair oils) must be removed. I reiterate - I am just taking about general greyness that comes with old paintwork.
We all know the manufacturers will stretch their claims to the limit. And I am saying, IME, it's best to roughly halve those claims in the real world. Paint often gets cheaper per unit quantity anyway, so it's better to buy 2l than 1l then have to go back for another 1l.
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On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 20:17:38 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

I usually come in right about in the middle. I have to say, though, after watching my wife and son paint a room recently- I get all my paint on the wall.<g>
I am not a fast painter-- but I do a good job and don't need much cleanup.
Jim
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For one coat, four gallons; for two coats, maybe seven but probably eight. Figure between 300 and 400 square feet per gallon, depending on method of application, type of surface, etc. For a previously painted wal, probably closer to 400 than 300.
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Go to your local True Value-- or a paint store.
Ask for the price on a 5 gallon pail of their *best* paint.
Save yourself a lot of aggravation.
Jim
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On 1/25/2013 12:42 PM, Dottie wrote:

color. I measured (three walls have those tall vaulted ceilings) -- but as best I can tell - the area measures 1441 sq.ft. I have thrown away the sales slips for the paint we bought - years ago - and I have no idea how many gallons. It will be flat paint, as close to the original color as possible. Hopefully, one coat will cover it. How many gallons do I need? My late husband always bought the paint - well, I bought it, but he told me how many gallons to buy. Any help would be appreciated. Will probably shop at Home Depot or Lowes. Thanks.

I'm a little puzzled by your description of the rooms, but assume the sq. ft. number is WALL area, not floor area. The area taken up by windows and doorways should be factored into the area to be covered, as should the roughness (more) or smoothness of the surface. Assume similar colors, not very deep or dark? I have never been able to get the coverage stated on the can, so one's technique matters, too.
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On Friday, January 25, 2013 12:42:02 PM UTC-5, Dottie wrote:

We will be rolling the paint on. If we can paint this area without doing major physical damage to my back -- the other rooms are painted in the same color so I can always use any left over to do them. Thanks for your help. Just need to be sure we measured right.

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wrote:

color. I measured (three walls have those tall vaulted ceilings) -- but as best I can tell - the area measures 1441 sq.ft. I have thrown away the sales slips for the paint we bought - years ago - and I have no idea how many gallons. It will be flat paint, as close to the original color as possible. Hopefully, one coat will cover it. How many gallons do I need? My late husband always bought the paint - well, I bought it, but he told me how many gallons to buy. Any help would be appreciated. Will probably shop at Home Depot or Lowes. Thanks.

physical damage to my back -- the other rooms are painted in the same color so I can always use any left over to do them. Thanks for your help. Just need to be sure we measured right.

I think most replies you got so far are good ones. I guess I'd ask the paint store what they think the coverage will be if you roll it on. Likely at the lower end but why guess, just ask them. I'm sure they have a good idea if you tell them what you are doing. And as others suggest, might as well price a 5 gal bucket of paint and compare to 4 single gallons. I also agree don't get the cheap paint. I would not consider less than the middle grade or better. And yes I know it's not cheap but it might save you in the long run and be easier to apply too unless you are selling the house in a short time. Then in that case I'd use the cheaper grade paint.
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Dottie wrote:

Although you didn't ask, I recommend one of the books on painting tips you'll find at the box store. In it, you'll find dozens of ways to make your job easier. Here are a few (for latex):
* Oil and water don't mix. This means that if you spray your hands with PAM before the job, cleaning them up is SO much easier! * Oxygen is the enemy of paint. Don't use the original container as the source of application; pour the paint into a smaller, hand-held container. When pausing or stopping, shoot a little of the aforementioned PAM in the can. It floats atop the paint and acts as an air barrier. * Cleaning brushes and the like is much, much easier if you add a bit of fabric softener to the cleaning pail. * If you wear glasses, cover them with a bit of cling-wrap. Presto: no spotting.
And so on.
Further, are you sure you want to use "flat"? Satin or semi-gloss usually gives a better look. And do your figures include the ceiling? In almost all cases, the ceiling should be white. In fact, there is a special blend called, believe it or not, "Ceiling Paint." Look for it.
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After 45 years in the painting contracting business. I have seen everything from lead based paint to new modern synthetic based latex paints.
You will never find a paint that satisfies you completely.
buy your material, paint, and see what you have wrought. of course put a primer on new dry wall. And maybe over a repaint....But, painting is somewhat of a guessing game. Ask me.... I know.
So paint til you run out, then go buy more.
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Yeah, except for getting the PAM off your hands...
Disposable latex or nitrile gloves make cleanup even easier.

To the OP: this is a Bad Idea. Ignore it.

Likewise.
And no ability to see detail, either.
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A painter once told me to store left-over paint cans upside-down so they don't skin over. I've done that and used paint a decade later to touch something up and couldn't see any difference.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Your comments are interesting. Most of the hints I offered - from one of the painting-tips books - came with a "why" attached. Your disagreements came with no basis, just contrariness.
If you can back up your disagreements, I'd be pleased to hear your side of the various arguments. If, however, you are limited to screaming: "Liar! Liar!," spare us.
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You really need an explanation for why putting PAM in your paint is a bad idea? Just look at the first sentence of your own second paragraph: oil and water don't mix.
You must not need eyeglasses to see clearly, if you don't see anything wrong with putting cling-wrap over eyeglasses.
Fabric softener isn't needed to get paint out of a brush, and there's no point in needlessly adding chemicals to anything.
Looks to me like you don't really know much about painting at all, just copy-and-pasted some list of tips you found online somewhere...
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