Paint Blistering - Bathroom

Page 1 of 2  
After being in the house for about 7 years, we decided to repaint. We hired a professional painter. Everything came out fine. A few months later, the paint in the smallest bathroom started to blister. We had used the best paint available for bathrooms. Prior to repainting, there was no blistering, though the tape on some seams had started to peel a bit. The painter came back out, scraped off everything that was loose, reprimed and repainted. A few months later- same problem. He came out again. This time, we replaced the exahust fan with a stronger fan and vented it to the eave. He scraped, primed, painted. This time we let the primer dry for a month (and no blistering). He then painted, and we let it dry for a week before using the shower in that bathroom. A few months later- same problem. In each case, the blistering occurred in the spring or fall, when the heat pump/ac was least active, so the air was not drying very quickly.
Anyway... What is the least expensive way to fix this problem? Wallpaper is fine, if that will work. Our painter doesn't think it will, but I am not so sure of his knowledge now. I don't know if the previous owners had used an oil-based (or other non-latex) paint prior. Oh, one other intersting thing- when he scraped the last time, in some areas the paint came off all the way down to the greeenboard. No mold or mildew, just blistering like crazy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Did he use oil or latex, and which one for primer and finish paint?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the
came
A
replaced
scraped,
least
an
Latex for both.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hmm. Someone will disagree with me here based on their own luck using latex, but personally, I would never use latex paint in a damp environment. You could still have problems with oil paint if the prep work wasn't done right, but barring that, oil will always hold up better. Do whatever you can to assure perfect conditions such as temperature, even if it means you have to wait till spring so you can open the windows & prevent damaging your brain cells from the fumes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

best
using
used
the
crazy.
latex,
right,
to
What kills me is that I asked this guy about that, and he said that latex is no problem- he uses it all the time. He would probably come back out again if I asked him to, but he's already convinced me that he has no clue- so why bother.... Well, onward... What is involved with the prep for oil? Scraping down to bare geenboard is probably not realistic. Just scrape off whatever I can? I will defintely wait till spring.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/18/2005 12:36 PM US(ET), Alan took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

My 20 year old bathrooms (with showers) were all originally painted with latex and have been repainted with latex a couple of times since. I have never had a problem with bubbling of the paint.
--
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just get the latex surface screaming clean.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sand ceiling with a power sander, and re-paint with a 2-part epoxy. It might come off again, but if it does, it's taking the sheetrock with it.
--Goedjn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The original paint was a base with a color sponged on. Either one may have been a gloss, I'm not sure. I have a hunch the sponged on was gloss. How can I test the original now that it's been covered so many times? And if it was oil, can I fix this mess by scraping off as much of the new latex as possible and then painting with oil?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Alan wrote:

Is it peeling only in one area? Same place after repaint? If so, I would be looking for moisture intrusion from behind the wall. It should not be that localized if it is faulty paint job, unless the wall wasn't cleaned properly - soap scum, mildew, greasy hands will cause poor adhesion but shouldn't make the paint blister.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A more powerful fan should help remove moisture, but the fan needs to run 20-30 minutes after bathing. A timer switch is good for this. Another thought, you may have a leak inside the wall somewhere.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's blistering everywhere- the closer to the shower, the more it blisters, so I doubt it's a leak. When the heat pump is off, we keep the blower on to keep the air moving. Just leaving the door open clears it out in 10-20 minutes. I was hoping the exhaust fan would suck out the moisture as it is generated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mine does, but it's a small bathroom, and the previous owner said he installed a fan rated for a room twice the size. Considering the way it performs, and the fact that it rattles the glassware in the kitchen, I think he did the right thing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

is
think
I would have loved to put in an even bigger fan, but this bathroom is off the bedroom, and the fan is noisy enough as it is. They get pretty pricey if you want a quiet, powerful fan.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

to
10-20
it
off
pricey
Well, it's like I always say- Hindsight is 20/20, but foresight is only 50/50. The new fan was well over $100, and the "right" fan was probably around $300 or so. Anyway, the real problem in all of this, is, I suspect, the painter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it is the painter's fault, how do you explain the tape peeling before the painter touched it?
Paint is not water proofing, so when you get moisture under the paint you are going to have a problem.
You either have a plumbing leak, a wall or roof leak or your fan is not sucking enough steam out of the bathroom.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wouldn't, until you know what's going on with the blistering. Do you want wallpaper because it might look good, or because you're sick of dealing with the paint issue?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

only
probably
before
you
want
with
More because of the paint issue, but it would also look better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well....take lots of time to interview people who can show you how to do the wallpaper the right way. The wallpaper in my bathroom was also installed in the shower area, above the tile which ends at about 6 feet. The previous owners installed it two years ago and the edges are beginning to peel. At this point, it's just enough to get a fingernail under, which seems like NOT enough to get a tool under to "inject" more adhesive. The issue is not ventilation. During a shower, with the bathroom door closed, the fan keeps the room very dry, even downright chilly. But, a fan can't do anything about water droplets that are splashed around in the shower itself.
I'm beginning to think wallpaper within the shower stall is about as smart as putting it on the outside of a boat's hull.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

is off

pricey if

There are really good quiet fans now, such as Panasonic, for $100-150. Also timer switches. Both well worth the money. Be sure the timer switch is for inductive loads or it will ruin the fan. Don't ask how I know!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.