paint and light


This isn't exactly a home repair question, but I am new to the site and hope someone can point me in the right direction. I have moved from the deep south (lots of sun) to the pacific northwest (sun-challenged) and from a traditional ranch home with 8 foot ceilings to a house with an open floor plan. I am intimidated by the walls in my new house. I need all the light I can get but the 12' to 16' off-white walls are so boring. In addition, the new house has 8 to 16 foot walls with a 'layered' appearance. When you look from the living room (8, 12 and 16 ft walls) toward the front door you see the living room wall (8 foot), the wall on the stairs (1 to 5 ft) the open walkway (12 foot) to the upstairs rooms and two walls of the entry way (16 ft). Then there are 8 foot walls under the open walkway between the entry and the living room. It is architecturally interesting but a challenge for me. First, how do you paint 16 foot walls/ ceilings? Second, how do I get some color in the rooms without losing light? Third, do I use one color or do I mix shades/colors to emphasize the layered appearance. I would appreciate any suggestions.
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Rent some staging to reach the high spots.
Use a light color to keep it bright, but add some color accents. They can be multiple shades of the same color for trim, etc. Depending on your likes, a rich yellow, then orange, then red in limited amounts can make a big impact.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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I agree with Ed. Your situation really calls for visualising a color scheme for the whole house, with the open areas all from complementary color family, and perhaps some surprising/ contrasting colors in any rooms that are enclosed/ visually separated from the main area. It's going to be a big job. Have fun.
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wrote:

You don't paint them, you hang tapestries, Hopi blankets, and/or light sculptures on them to produce color. Find a local artist who doesn't suck out loud, and buy his stuff.
Invest in more light fixtures, and put full-spectrum bulbs/tubes in them.
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snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net says...

Extensions on the roller. I have one that extends to 16' or so (my cathedral ceiling is about 17' at the peak). For the walls I use extension and step ladders.

Light colors?

Hire and interior designer.
--
Keith

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light lover wrote:

You need some decorating books and color brochures :o) The general principle is that rooms visible from other rooms should relate in some way, which doesn't mean they must match. I have been in homes with black walls (living room with white carpet), red dining room, dark purple. If you are looking forward to major redecorating, it might be a good idea to spend a year in different seasons and lighting needs to get a better idea. Changing the lighting might be a better investment. Boring white can be less boring than some strong colors that have more impact and keep "reminding" you that you are tired of them.
One theory is that favorite colors in clothing are good colors for decorating. It's really a matter of taste and budget. Folks who get the blues in winter might do better in home dec. with a warm pallett and bright lighting.
You can add color and interest with large paintings or posters, groups of photos, etc. Hang a rug or group of baskets on tall walls. Lots of ways to add interest.
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