pad for washer/dryer in garage

Hello ng,
I'm moving washer/dryer to my oregon garage, and the place where I'm gonna put them is a local low. I sure as heck don't want that....
So, I get me a bag of self-leveler, runs 19 bucks, and that's a bullet I only want to eat once. I could level out the area with self leveler, but what would the edges look like?
So I thought, gosh, why not a pad for the washer and dryer made from concrete? Has anyone done this?
My idea might be to make it an inch high. I might form it with wood and then put masking tape on the inside of the form so that the edge stays pristine.
What do you think?
--
Cal

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On 10/23/2015 8:47 PM, Cal Dershowitz wrote:

Be sure you check local codes, first. You might find that the dryer has to be elevated above the main level of the floor (gasoline vapors)
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On 10/23/2015 8:53 PM, Don Y wrote:

This one is 240 electrical, and the only relevant code is UBC.
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Cal

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Garages are often considred (in this case by the electrical codes, both NEC and local jurisdictions) high hazard locations, and as such additional rules apply.
Just as one example, take a look at the locations of the electrical outlets in (the vast majority of) garages.
They're not near ground level. They're five feet up.
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On 10/23/2015 9:04 PM, Cal Dershowitz wrote:

I think the issue has to do with ignition sources being *above* the level where gasoline vapors will settle. E.g., an entrance into a home is typically *higher* than the floor level of the garage so these vapors can't enter the house.
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On 10/23/2015 10:08 PM, Don Y wrote:

There's a dozen outlets in this garage at differing heights. If gas is clouded to the point where an outlet is going to matter, then you died of a gas leak....
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On 10/24/2015 11:28 AM, Cal Dershowitz wrote:

The *outlet* isn't the issue. A garage circuit must be GFCI protected -- but you may be able to work around that with a dedicated circuit (?)
The issue has to do with the likely ignition source colocated in a place where volatile fumes *will* be encountered.
Hey, if you're sure, go ahead and do whatever you want! If the house *doesn't* catch fire, you'll only know about the potential violation when you go to *sell* it -- and an inspector flags the item (which means you must then notify ALL potential buyers of this issue and hope one of them wants to figure out how to move the laundry)
Please reread my initial reply: I didn't tell you NOT to do this. Rather, I *suggested* you might want to do a bit of research (do you own a telephone?) before embarking on this: "Be sure you check local codes, first. You might find that the dryer has to be elevated above the main level of the floor (gasoline vapors)" As your washer and dryer were NOT originally in the garage: "I'm moving washer/dryer to my oregon garage, and the place where I'm gonna put them is a local low. I sure as heck don't want that" I can't infer that this placement *would* be legal to your local code (here, garage laundry's are all located 6 inches above the level of the garage floor -- even *electric* appliances). So, it seemed prudent to CHECK, FIRST!
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On 10/24/2015 11:39 AM, Don Y wrote:

I appreciate your concern, but there are no local codes. I'm building to UBC.
Maybe I should have also mentioned that I'm a journeyman carpenter, and I've never had anything red-tagged or that blew up or caught fire or fell down.
It seems to me that if I were going to try to satisfy a stricter code, I would raise the level of the appliances quite justifiably. They are front loaders. The washer has a vanity on its backside that it can share DWV with, so the modification to the plumbing is minimal.
Given that I'm gonna raise it with concrete whether it's required or not, what height would you go? I'm thinking 1-1/2".
Should I go the whole 6?
--
Cal

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On 10/24/2015 2:29 PM, Cal Dershowitz wrote:

You have to decide if you think the code is there to be nit-picky *or* to protect you (and your neighbors) from things that can and do go wrong.

I have no idea. Our laundry is in the house -- proximaate to the garage. Other neighbors who have laundry *hookups* (i.e., the house was built with this use in mind -- 30+ years ago) have their "laundry closets" deliberately elevated. Other "closets" (storage areas similar in size, shape AND LOCATION to the laundry closet) are at "garage floor level". I.e., someone incurred extra costs to ensure these laundry areas were elevated (to the same level of the rest of the house -- ABOVE the garage floor)
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On 10/24/2015 5:29 PM, Cal Dershowitz wrote:

OK, front loaders are different. They sell stands for them that are 12" or more higher. I'd build a platform about that height making it easier to to move clothes from washer to dryer. Back saver.
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On 10/24/2015 5:38 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

We've found it isn't a cut-and-dry decision.
With the appliances at "floor level", you have a useful work surface on the tops of each. But, the washer is a killer (wet clothes are heavy so transferring them to the dryer is rough on the lower back)
Elevate them and it's a lot easier to gain access. But, the top work surface disappears. In our case, we have cabinets above the appliances. With them at floor level, there is a useful gap between the appliance tops and the cabinet undersides; once elevated, that gap disappears -- taking the work surface with it.
The honey-do list includes fabricating a powered scissor lift for them so we can raise them to unload and lower to have the tops available (to fold clothes, etc.)
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On a sort of washing machine note, I was in a laundromat in about 1985 or so. They had a posterboard sign with magic marker writing.
"THESE ARE IOLB WASHERS"
I'd wondered what iolb meant? Years later, might have an idea. Anyone want to guess what iolb is?
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Sure 10 lb. Laudromat near here has a similar sign.
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Cal Dershowitz wrote:

I don't think concrete is satisfactory for a pad that thin. Sand mix maybe. Me, I'd just use 2x4s.
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On 10/23/2015 10:47 PM, Cal Dershowitz wrote:

I did that once where the slope to a floor drain made leveling the washer/dryer hard to keep level, I made the forms 3 1/2 inches because that's what the 2x4 I used decided it would be. Made for a nice solid base and a leaking washing machine or hose won't ruin it. Tamp any air bubbles out, push the gravel down if there is any and finish it with concrete finishing tools, a little slope to the front, just enough so water won't puddle to the sides or wall.
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On 10/23/2015 11:47 PM, Cal Dershowitz wrote:

Inch thick concrete would be prone to cracking. I'd go 2" or more, but first . . .
If it is a top loader, will you or your wife be able to reach in comfortably? Our washer is a couple of inches higher than the older model and my 5'3" wife can barely reach in to get stuff off the bottom of the tub. Another inch would be a problem.
Concrete is pretty permanent so I'd consider a 2 x 3 frame with plywood top.
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On 10/23/2015 11:47 PM, Cal Dershowitz wrote:

Don't do it! I did that once, wife hated it. Actually, I hated it as well. So we added a master bedroom, closet (85% hers, 15% mine), bath and laundry room to house. Now wife happy! Happy wife, happy life.
FWIW, in our jurisdiction, code requires all appliances to be 18" off a garage floor. Has something to do with sparks and gas fumes. So if you have a top-load washer, you'll need to build the platform large enough to stand on while loading the washer. And since your new platform is 18" above the floor, you may also be required by insurance and/or AHJ to build a step and railings.
If you still insist on garage laundry, it might be best to purchase front-load models with all controls and filters on the front of the machines so you can eliminate the operator part of the platform as well as the steps/railings.
And when it's time to service the unit, obviously you have another problem. How's your back? Or do you own a small fork lift? I ask because some appliance service companies now require the unit to be at floor level before they will perform repairs.
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On 10/24/2015 6:25 AM, V. Erbose wrote:

It has to be. The kitchenette is going where the washer and dryer are now, and the laundry wasn't well-located where it was. So it's going out, make no mistake....

You see that in Arizona, California, but here in the sticks, we have UBC. Since the water heater is right next to this and on the garage floor, I can deduce that this is not against local code.

We do have front load. Going up an inch or two is fine for people of this household's stature. I'm in a tall club.

This pad would bring it up to be more ergonomic for me.
--
Cal


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