Oxygen line between floors?

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Just off the top of my head, a couple ideas.
1) Longer tube length, needs larger diameter. 2) Wouldn't want to use any kind of tube that requires cement, as that would put a bunch of organic solvents into her breathing oxygen. No PVC with cement, for example.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
My wife just got home from the hospital with an oxygen concentrator and some tanks.
ISTM that the best setup for us would be to keep the concentrator upstairs in the bedroom- and run a second line through the floor to the living room below.
The guy last night says they are made to run 24/7. I'm thinking a 2 way valve and some sort of grommet to go between floors should do me.
The valve is no rush- I'll pick that up online and just plug/unplug in the meantime.
I'd like some feedback on the 'floor grommet' first. the floor upstairs is a floating laminate floor over 1x8 shiplap. [it is a 100+ yr old house] There are 2x8 joists- and 1/2" sheetrock below.
In my mind I'm picturing 2 pieces of 'pipe' with flattened/flared ends- drill the hole, and insert from both sides.
Is there such a thing? Or do I buy 2 grommets and a piece of pipe?
This will be more or less permanent-- If we're 'lucky'- we'll be using this setup for a few years. OTOH- when it is no longer necessary, it would be nice to leave and easily plugged pair of holes.
Thanks, Jim
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wrote:

The concentrator company should be willing to give you some extra line. The tubing is cheap and any supplier should have plenty on the truck. Although some have suggested a larger tubing, it must be certified for medical oxygen as you don't want to carry any sort of plasticisers in the tubing to the patient.
The maximum the concentrator should have is a 50' extension or you will get a lot of line loss. If say, she is on 2 liters, you can bump it to 2.5 to compensate a little. They also have connectors so you can put together two 25's to get what you need.
The cannula should be changed at least once a week (they should have given you a bunch) but the straight tubing will last a very long time. Once a month someone should be coming out to check the machine and test the oxygen levels. That person should also be carrying supplies so be sure to ask for whatever you need.
The tanks are for portability. They can also be used in the event of power failure, but Medicare won't pay for that use, only portability. If for any reason, you can't get what you need, you can change suppliers. Every area usually has a few and you don't have to stick with the one your doctor or hospital recommends.
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Call your electric company, since you are using life support equiptement the electric company will put you FIRST in the event of a outage. if a power failure occurs call them immediately and remind them of life support
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-snip

I should have held off on the generator and tried a medical deduction for it.<g>
good point- I'll try to remember that.
Jim
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wrote:

If the tax saving is sufficent there is always an ammended return.
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On 02-17-2013 16:47, NotMe wrote:

Not if he bought it before there was a medical reason.
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Wes Groleau

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On 2/17/2013 11:26 AM, bob haller wrote:

As long as it isn't a really long power loss there is no issue at least regarding oxygen since they included some tanks.
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Extra line is no problem. They gave me (2) 40' lengths. One gets her around either floor fairly well. But rather than dragging the concentrator up and down stairs several times a day I'd like to just use a 40' length on each floor-
I would still use the supplied tubing-- I just wanted an easy way to drop it through to the floor below. We're fortunate that the LR is right below the bedroom- so the 'base area' is the same day and night.
-snip-

They left lots of those and said the 'regular' guy would be out in a week or so. [She was discharged at 5PM with a tank- and the company was called. The driver called and said he'd be here in 4 hours- he got here a little after 9 and had 8 more stops to go. [from 7AM -- good kid, I sure wouldn't want *that* job.<g>]

The hospital was cagey on this one. They made my wife pick from the 7 they had listed. She took the one that was founded by a gal her mom used to ride with in the local rescue squad. If they come through with a mask today- we'll stick with them. [can't believe they didn't include the mask-- and need a script to bring me one--- when she falls asleep her mouth opens, and she doesn't get any oxygen-- It seems to me that can't be that unusual.]
Sounds like you've been this way-- anything else we need to remember when the guy shows up next week?
Thanks- Jim
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wrote:

I used to do new starts on weekends. Sometimes you did nothing, other times you got callas at all hours. Like the time I drove 40 miles at 11 PM because the elderly couple could not find the "on" switch on the unit after it was shut off earlier.

It is not that unusual and you don't really need a mask. The constant flow through the cannula gives enough oxygen that you will breath in a higher level through the mouth. Some people put the cannula on upside down to point the outlets towards the mouth.
Even though we need oxygen to live, you cant get it and some of the equipment without a script.

Be sure he shows you where the filter is so you can clean it every week or so. That is the only maintenance you have to do. If they did not show you already, learn how to change the portable tanks and regulator. If you are going to be going out a lot, there are some very small portable units that make it easier to do so. They use smaller tanks and are lighter and easily carried. They are expensive and since the company gets a fixed price, they are reluctant to give them to patients that don't need them.
If you do go out often, inquire about liquid oxygen. You have a large (70 pounds) canister at home and you fill a portable from it as needed. It is silent, it is easy to use. It is more costly and less convenient for the supplier so many are reluctant to give them to patients. They have to be filled every 7 to 10 days. We've used them when a patient went on a week long trip too by fitting it into their car.

You're welcome
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Don't know if they both needed it-- but I am amazed at how important o2 is to any kind of coherent thought. My wife couldn't find the switch this morning.
-snip-

Ah thanks-- good tip. I'm glad you said that because that was essentially what the O2 place said and I would have been a little wary about it if I hadn't heard it here first.

I wonder if the abuses might be-- or is there just that good a medical o2 lobby.<g> The hospital case manager is putting in a call to the o2 company -

The guy who dropped off the concentrator mentioned the filter and said it would go back tot hem for service in [6 months?] -- I'll poke around for a model number and see if I can confirm that before the other guy comes out.

He said they'd drop a couple of the smaller tanks [pocket-book size] but he just had the bigger ones on the truck.

I'll keep that in mind. See how the tanks and delivery work out--
appreciate your help- Help-
Thanks
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

I would suggest being very careful and definitely checking with your wife's medical providers before putting on any kind of O2 mask at night. The machine puts out low-flow O2 via a nasal cannula which you can set to the proper setting, such as 2 LPM or whatever is prescribed. But, while that's on, the patient is also breathing in room air. With a mask on, it restricts the amount of room air that can be breathed in (sort of like breathing into a paper bag), and I doubt that the 2 LPM of O2 going into the mask would make up for the reduction in room air being inhaled.
So, unless there is some special mask for this type of situation that I don't know about, I would be concerned that placing a mask on at night could cause hypoxia (lack of oxygen). Of course, maybe there is some type of mask that would work in the type of scenario you are describing (sleeping at night and mouth breathing with a mask on), but I am not aware of one.
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-snip-

The o2 place didn't go into that much detail-- but from what they said, you are probably spot on. They said a mask would only be used with 6ml of o2-- and she is on 2.
Thanks-- I love it when this group is all that it can be.
Jim
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On 2/17/2013 7:14 PM, TomR wrote:

My late friend GB had O2 from his machine running around the house with tubing but the problem he had was rolling over in his sleep and pinching off the oxygen supply to his cannula. He would wake up feeling quite uncomfortable only to realize there was a kink in the O2 line. My friend was a 71 year old Juvenal delinquent who would hide his smoking from me and his family even after losing a lung to cancer, the addiction was too strong. We all miss him. O_o
TDD
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On 2/17/2013 9:10 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

"Juvenal" geez, my friend was a funny guy but but not a Roman. The word "juvenile" described him more closely. O_o
TDD
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On 02-17-2013 13:21, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Ours bubbled the oxygen through water. that was needed so it wouldn't be dry and it doubled as a filter. We had two of them--when one got low, switch and rinse the other. (And it never looked dirty)
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Wes Groleau

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On 02-17-2013 10:57, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

As I understood it, our concentrator delivered a set volume, not a set pressure.
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Wes Groleau

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On 02-17-2013 07:05, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

The one we had could easily be carried anywhere in the house. We could have bought it for $700 but it was rented by our insurance.
We didn't move it though. We placed it near the bottom of the stairs, and got enough tubing to reach anywhere in the house from there.
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Wes Groleau

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On 02-18-2013 00:47, Wes Groleau wrote:

By the way, if you don't mind spending money for convenience, true portables are "only" a few thousand.
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wrote:

They make squeezable hose clamps, although I don't kow if they work for the size hose you'll be using. You squeeze to open. shaped like a genie's bottle plus the finger parts.
But valves are readily available on the web.

Don't try to go through the joists. Other than that, I'll bet you can go years without much wear on the hose, and that the hose won't be expensive to replace every 5 or 10 years. By leaving slack, you can pull the hose out of the hole every year and see if it has abraded much. By firmly attaching the hose one or two feett away from the hole on each side, you can prevent any abraision except that caused by your house shaking. IOW, it might last 100 years.

That's why the hole should be just a little bigger than the hose, and no extra nail holes or anything. You can probably put it at the edge of at least one** of the rooms, like cable tv. **Where it will come out in the other room may take some work to predict. When I ran cable, I was able to drill a hole in a closet that came out just above a bookcase the previous owner had built. Had he built the bookcase a little "better" this couldn't have happened. I've had this co-axial cable groing from the 2nd floor to the first, and from the first to the basmenet, and from the basement back up to the kitchen. And from the 2nd floor up to the attic adn down throug the wall to the bathroom and the office, for 30 years, and haven't even considered checking on abrasion I'm sure there is no more than a micron or two.
They make 12" drills and longer, and 36" and flexible even , with a little hole near the tip, so you can drill the hole, pull back a piece of wire, attach that to the hose and pull it through the hole.

I hope your wife is feelign well. I've seen those oxygen concentrators advertised on tv, adn I looked them up in wikip. Just watching tv, it sounded like snake oill, but it's amazing. I'm not cleverr enough to think of such a thing.
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