Oxygen line between floors?

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My wife just got home from the hospital with an oxygen concentrator and some tanks.
ISTM that the best setup for us would be to keep the concentrator upstairs in the bedroom- and run a second line through the floor to the living room below.
The guy last night says they are made to run 24/7. I'm thinking a 2 way valve and some sort of grommet to go between floors should do me.
The valve is no rush- I'll pick that up online and just plug/unplug in the meantime.
I'd like some feedback on the 'floor grommet' first. the floor upstairs is a floating laminate floor over 1x8 shiplap. [it is a 100+ yr old house] There are 2x8 joists- and 1/2" sheetrock below.
In my mind I'm picturing 2 pieces of 'pipe' with flattened/flared ends- drill the hole, and insert from both sides.
Is there such a thing? Or do I buy 2 grommets and a piece of pipe?
This will be more or less permanent-- If we're 'lucky'- we'll be using this setup for a few years. OTOH- when it is no longer necessary, it would be nice to leave and easily plugged pair of holes.
Thanks, Jim
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How about just a piece of that flexible split plastic conduit/jacket type product that's typically used to hold a group of wires together? I've seen it in places like HD. Could drill the hole, put a piece of it in that extends a few inches beyond, glue it in place with some silicone or vinyl caulk.
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... or some clear vinyl tubing with a diameter slightly larger than the oxygen line.
http://images.lowes.com/product/converted/048643/048643025561lg.jpg
I used some to build a scarf hanger for a friend. It's pretty sturdy material.
http://www.etsy.com/listing/18772149/golden-velvet-scarf-hanger
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-snip-

Good idea-- I've got a roll in the garage-
Thanks
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wrote:

Tubing needs to be medical grade as otherwise you could be poisoning your wife.
Also check on the code requirements as piping O2 around the house without meeting codes could void your insuance.
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The idea is to use an outside tube to penetrate the floor, to protect the oxygen line inside. It doesn't need to be medical grade at all, though I'd be a little concerned about a fire.

Good grief, more insurance fear-mongering.
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wrote:

Check the code and best practices. Assmutions on ducting and conduit have been known to cause problems.

BTDT, burned once now twice sensitive.
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he

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Perhaps you'd like to share with us the specifics of what exactly you did that voided your homeowners insurance.
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On Mon, 18 Feb 2013 05:13:43 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

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The clear vinyl tubing is being recommended as a "sleave" through the floor/ceiling cavity - NOT as an oxygen line.
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You are missing the goal of Jim's request. He wants some type of conduit to protect the actual oxygen tube as it passes through the floor/ceiling from the bedroom to the living room.
No on is suggesting that he replace the tubing that came with the generator.
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wrote:

Matters not the original intent. The point was that if it's not done to code and there is any damage that could/might be attributed to the install the insurance company can void the coverage and not pay damages.
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Perhaps you missed the part where some of us asked for the details of your own experience with insurance that you're basing this on. The reason for this is that this assertion is thrown out here frequently by some folks. The typical assertion is that if one does some home repair and doesn't do it correctly, without a permit, etc, the insurance company will not pay out on the claim.
Now with the huge amount of work we all know gets done without permits, these cases should be popping up all over the place. Yet, I still have not seen a reference to a case.......
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I know what the point of the second part of your response was ("Also check on the code requirements as piping O2 around the house...") but that is not the part of your post that I was responding to.
I was specifically responding to "Tubing needs to be medical grade as otherwise you could be poisoning your wife."
Neither the OP (Jim) or me were talking talking about using the vinyl tubing as the oxygen line. We were takling about using the vinyl tubing for the sleeve he want's to install between floors. Yes, whatever he installs might be need some code clarification, but installing the vinyl *as a sleeve* is not going to poison his wife.
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The only possible issue is requirement for fire-stop - which on single unit residential is not really an issue. Going between units would require the sleave to be fire-stopped - and even then - with only a half inch hole it's not much of an issue. Nothing that would trigger any problem with homeowners insurance in a single family dwelling - particularly with an open staircase between floors.
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the

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Yawn....Still waiting for specifics on your personal experience where insurance coverage was denied because some work was not done to code...... was denied
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I was responding only to your comment about poisoning his wife. The tubing he uses to create a sleeve between floors does not need to be medical grade.
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Long as the caulk doesn't offgas into the oxygen?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
How about just a piece of that flexible split plastic conduit/jacket type product that's typically used to hold a group of wires together? I've seen it in places like HD. Could drill the hole, put a piece of it in that extends a few inches beyond, glue it in place with some silicone or vinyl caulk.
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On Feb 17, 10:00 am, "Stormin Mormon"

The caulk doesn't even touch the pipe carrying the oxygen. The idea is to use a piece of the flex split conduit material and use caulk around that to hold it in place. The flexible oxygen hose then passes through it. DerbyDad suggested similar idea using clear viny tubing. That's probably a better idea because it easy to find, they sell it by the foot in any size you want, etc. A somewhat tougher hose than the vinyl might be better though so it can't kink as easily.
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-snip-

Thanks-- I think DD's 'improvement' will make that the quick-easy-good-enough solution.
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