Oxalic acid

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I have read that deck cleaners are basically Oxalic acid. Being the cheap-skate that I am does anyone know where can I buy Oxalic acid to clean my deck?
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higgledy wrote:

My experience (and by the smell), is that they are nothing more than sodium hyprchlorite -- simple BLEACH. Just use that. I've used it in both as a spray with my power washer (best strategy), or with a bonnet scubber (for carpets). The issue is killing the algae off. I have found that once a year does the trick nicely. The power washer (Karcher) is the best investment I've ever made. Useful for all sorts of heavy cleaning jobs.
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Your response is totally wrong. Just Google "Oxalic Acid" and you will see the difference from bleach.
professorpaul wrote:

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I used pool shock to clean mine worked better than the deck cleaner I bought. But it did stink. I threw a bag in a 5 gal. bucket used a broom to ably it, scrubbed it in, let it soak then hosed it off.
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higgledy writes:

Paint store, or paint dept at Home Depot or Lowes.
Toxic stuff, so read and heed the warnings.
Entirely different mode of action from chlorine bleach others are suggesting.
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On 6/9/06 4:05 PM, in article Xns97DDC24356904someconundrum@216.196.97.131,

IIRC from my youth, there was a product called okite or okonite or something like that that was primarily oxalic acid.
It is found in rhubarb. You can taste it. The leaves are trimmed in stores to get rid of most of it.
It is what used to be a common chemical. With the DEA, liability problems, and the general momma knows best Government, it is more difficult to get such chemicals.
Bill
-- Ferme le Bush
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Salmon Egg writes:

Difficult? I would say easier than ever. It's on the shelf at the retailers I mentioned.
The labeling of common chemicals with brand names that try to hide what is in the product is more of a reason that things like oxalic acid *appear* to have disappeared. You won't find a package of MSG in the grocery store, but you will find Accent.
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On 6/9/06 10:32 PM, in article Xns97DEFA5610C2someconundrum@216.196.97.131,

I do not deny that there are many chemicals out there disguised as home products. You just need to know what is what.
For example, concentrated sulfuric acid is available as drain cleaner at most hardware stores. As a chemical from a scientific supply house, it is almost impossible to buy. Aside from charging a lot. In addition to ordinary shipping costs, firms like UPS charges an extra $25 hazardous shipping costs. Even so, a company Wilkem Scientific would not ship chemicals to me personally because of liabilty. I was able to get a particular pH meter from Wilkem not available from other suppliers because of DEA restrictions.
Bill -- Ferme le Bush
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higgledy wrote:

Oxalic acid is a wood bleach and is toxic-posinios. Requires special handling. I would not recommend it. Go to a paint store they will carry a cleaner which I believe is called Tri-sodium Sulphate or phosphate. They will know which. It is an exellent cleaner.
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TSP was for many years the standard high octane cleaner. It worked fine. But then the environmentalists decided it might be harmful and it was removed from the market.
Oxalic acid is not as dangerous as the posters stated. It is the active ingredient in "Bartenders' Friend" and "Stainless Steel Cleaner" (spray). I use the latter to clean the permanganate ring on my toilets.
snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

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Stubby wrote:

You might want to tell Home Depot that.

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I swear HD, Wal-Mart, and the like remove such basic cleaners only so they can sell higher priced branded cleaners. In fact, I bet retailers are part of the environmental lobby in DC.
J. Clarke wrote:

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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Are you sure that's what you bought? There seem to be a number of products that say in big letters "T.S.P." and then in very small letters "substitute". Might want to check to be sure.
Pete C.
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Pete C. wrote:

<(Amazon.com product link shortened)"8013>
Now it might be that you live in the People's Republic of Leftcoastia or some other workers' paradise in which trisodium phosphate is banned, but that doesn't mean that the rest of us who live in the real world are so unfortunate.

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Pete C. wrote:

Yep you can get sucked into buying the silicate product if you don't carefully read the box. Personally I think it is fraud to call the silicate product TSP, design the box to look like the actual TSP product, and then put "substitute" in small letter. But, actual TSP is still sold.
OTOH, the silicate product (substitute TSP) washes off more easily than TSP, but it also clean a little less well than TSP. Take you choice.
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I checked it today and no where on it could I see anything to indicate it was not the real TSP.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Of course! It was never removed from the market, but the amount of phosphate was reduced or eliminated in many products a with concern for increasing algae growth in many water ways.
Lowes, here, ran out at the time I needed some, so they order some for me. Luckly I checked at a local paint store and bought the same size box for about $1 less.
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Stubby:
They did the same thing with clear kreosoot, used to preserve wood before painting. It was bad for the environment so they replaced it with vinyl wood. Makes sense, uh?
Stubby wrote:

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Stubby wrote:

How dangerous do you think it is, then?
Type the words "oxalic acid" and "poisonous" into your search engine, read the articles, and judge for yourself.
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