Owens Corning QuietZone --> marketing ploy

Hey, I thought you guys would want to know this. I certainly am kinda peeved about it, after doing like 10 hours of research on acoustic products like Owens Corning's QuietZone. Here's the story:
I decided to acoustically insulate our bedroom ceiling, because our children's rooms are right above us, and we get some noise. After a lot of research, I decided to order Owens Corning's QuietZone acoustic batts. I am also going to double sheetrock or put in a drop ceiling with acoustic panels, but the QuietZone product seemed a perfect start, and not too much money.
So my Home Depot sales guy seemed to know a lot about the product. Like it is more dense than regular insulation, and has no "thermal" value, ie, no R-value, it will allow heat to pass through. The only problem, Home Depot has to special order it, they do not stock.
While this was going on, I was walking through Home Depot one day and came across a new product called R-13 "Thermal and Acoustical" insulation. So I ask the same guy...what gives? He says, "that's just regular insulation, and they market it as an acoustical product now". OK, so what about the QuietZone product? "Oh, that's still the best stuff, don't get that insulation, you want the QuietZone."
Then I call Owens Corning this morning to find out where I can buy the stuff off the shelf. No clue, they say. They can not tell me where I can buy the stuff stocked. I got to special order. Then the fun begins. The OC customer service rep says... just buy the regular insulation, its the same stuff. I was like, what are you talking about? And she says hold, then comes back and says, yeah, I checked, just get regular insulation, its the same exact stuff, just a different facing on it, different packaging. I'm like...yeah, OK. Whatever, have a nice day
Then I go down to Home Depot to order the QuietZone product, because the Home Depot guy seemed more sure of himself. Sounded fishy to me... Then he has to call Owens Corning because the product numbers are not available to him. Then he finds out that QuietZone is not available in our area (Rochester NY). What? Yeah, they apprently only sell the stuff in the south. Huh? OK... he's going to do some more checking.
So he makes some calls while I go buy some plywood and a door. Then he comes and finds me with the "news"... Its the same stuff.
He talked to the customer service rep's manager, who then transferred him to the Home Depot account rep or something. Same story. The QuietZone product IS regular insulation, just packaged and marketed differently !!
You see, people don't buy insulation in the south. So they package it differently for a different application. A way to make more money is what I am thinking, pulling the "wool" over the consumer's eyes, so to speak (or their ears).
So the Home Depot guy says... we can special order the QuietZone, or you can buy that "Thermal and Acoustical" insulation sitting on the shelf. Its the same stuff, but you can take this home with you today, and its cheaper.
I am not a happy camper. Owens Corning stringing all of us along with a marketing ploy like this. And the Home Depot guy, what is he doing? Probably just regurgitating what he learned in a QuietZone training class. Spin city.
If only I could get Roxul to fit inbetween my joists...
Thought you might want to know...
kbmcdowell
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On 11/17/2005 6:26 PM or thereabouts, kbmcdowell appears, somewhat unbelievably, to have opined:

It is quite common for a product to be marketed under various names, in differing packaging, for differing uses, and/or in different areas. There is nothing dishonest or misleading here; just marketing folks trying to increase sales of their employer's products.
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Now, however, it is rather clear that I\'m simply an idiot.
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Dennis Turner wrote:

True if a product can be used effectively for different uses. However, R-13 insulation batts do nothing for reducing noise. My father thought regular fiberglass insulation would reduce sound transmission from a bathroom to add a degree of privacy. Didn't do anything. Actually it is pretty easy to tell whether regular insulation does anything. Just go up in the attic and have someone hollar up at you. Then lift a batt out of the way (or move the blown in insulation to the side and have them hollar up at you again. Course you could just put some music on your Hi-Fi to test the effect. Has hardly any effect.
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What's that in dB?
Nick
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wrote:

My son did a science experiment for school a few years back and I built a 5 zone box and we used different materials to stop noise and then we put an alarm clock in each of the chambers and measured the sound out put with an db meter. Fiberglass was one he used, sand, stones and others and solid 3/4" plywood and the plywood did the best stopping the sound.
Rich
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wrote:

Y'all expect too much from insulation. It is only PART of a noise reduction wall system.
The R-13 stuff is so labeled mostly because it is for 2x4 walls which are uncommon for exterior walls except in the southeast and west coast.
I put it in some walls in a bedroom remodel. Thogh it does not silence the livingroom TV, it makes it so I can't understand the dialog and now I can listen to a different program without competing.
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"Actually it is pretty easy to tell whether regular insulation does anything. Just go up in the attic and have someone hollar up at you. Then lift a batt out of the way (or move the blown in insulation to the side and have them hollar up at you again. Course you could just put some music on your Hi-Fi to test the effect. Has hardly any effect"
That it has some detectable effect at all would be fairly positive proof that it does in fact work. For your test, you are only removing one batt, a small percentage of the total insulation in the ceiling. The rest is still there and contributing to the sound reduction. To do the test right, you would have to remove all the insulation and then measure the sound difference.
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Well, I am double 3-1/2-in insulating my entire bedroom seiling (400 sf) and then sheetrocking the whole thing (and then maybe hanging suspended celing to boot). My 7-year old son plays upstairs in his bedroom every morning before school, and I know how loud he is, so I will report back once the insulation is in place. Just this morning he was commenting on how he could hear mommy and daddy talking before we went to bed, and his recollection was stunningly accurate. We'll just see how much he can hear after I'm done...
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kbmcdowell wrote:

The real question is what else has he heard mommy and daddy doing!
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Instead of just sheetrocking, put up a layer of asphalt roll-roofing first, then put lathe crosswise to the joists, and put the sheetrock up on that.
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Double sheetrock will help with noise.

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next, OC will find a way to sell ice to Alaskans!
Dave
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