Oversized generator

Page 2 of 2  
On Oct 8, 7:55am, "Stormin Mormon"

sensing RPM or frequency in a direct sense. Indirectly it is also responding to load since a heavier load will tend to slow the generator down. DC generators are regulated according to voltage usually with an exception being a welder which is current regulated.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Elbrecht wrote:

I live up North here in Alberta. Honda is most popular in the arctic circle. Honda units start best in cold weather.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Honda makes some nice generators. But they are not cheap. And up there you may use them more justifying the price. For the typical USA resident that just wants one as an emergency power source it's possible to use a cheaper generator. Unless losing pwoer is a very common occurence. For me it probably averages out to 10 hours a year with a pretty big standard deviation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jamesgangnc wrote:

Whoa! what is going on down there? I moved here from East in the spring of 1970. Since total time for power outage was less than 1 hours, longest being 24 minutes when pole burned up by grass fire near my home. They had to cut the power to replace the pole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A local appliance dealer was on the radio after a big storm and power outage here in CT. Seems that many new refrigerators have electronics in them and the generators were killing them. Maybe those cheap generators are no so cheap after all.
In my case, total outages are less that 40 hours in 66 years. I've not bought one yet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's something I think we all worry about. During the huricane I had a two year old Kitchenaid fridge, another five year old freezer and this PC all running on a cheap Chinese generator. All ran fine. But I did try to limit the potential for damage by not turning on the big LCD TV or other non-essential electronics.
This got me thinking. What exactly is the source of the generator issues that kills electronics? The generator is just a rotating magnetic field moving inside a fixed wire stator. So what exactly causes the problems? Is it some kind of surge issue when big loads turn on and off that creates big voltage spikes? It's hard to believe it's an overall voltage issue as you would think most electronics could tolerate running at 100V or 140V without damage. Anyone ever look at the waveform on an oscilloscope?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Maybe because the receptacle on the generator is slightly corroded and vibrating which causes arcing and sparking of the contacts?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It can also be something as simple as some other circuit on the genrator turning off and causing a big spike, however short, that blows the electronics. I think if there were just a steady resistive load, everything would be fine. I have a front porch light on a photocell/motion sensor that turns on about half the time that I turn off the ceiling fluorescent lights in the adjacent family room. They are on the same branch circuit. So there is some sort of a spike generated when I turn off the inductive ballasts of the fluorescent light that does its thing in the motion sensor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 7 Oct 2011 09:06:59 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc

need them.
If you are using the generator for "convenience" a failure is only an inconvenience. If using a generator for "emergency use", failure is an "emergency"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 8 Oct 2011 08:05:43 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Just say "as a smart guy I know once said" -- <BG>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

(ideally anyways) but at low load the RPM requires significantly less throttle - and less gas. 50% load will genereally require about 60% fuel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, you'll just burn down your house because the generator will be pumping 7000 Watts into the house and the house will only use 3500. The other 3500 Watts will build up as heat and eventually burst into flame.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/7/2011 9:58 AM, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Gawd I hope you aren't serious?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think his point is that based on physics, if the gas input did not vary based on load, there would be a hell of a lot of energy that would have to go somewhere when a 7000 watt generator is only putting out 3500 watts as electricity.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/7/2011 10:57 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

But was he serious or joking/being sarcastic?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is nothing to joke about. Thee are probably millions of watts of electricity floating about after storms, caused by careless generation. IMO, the government should regulate this. Congressional hearings are in order to get to the bottom of this. Bush ignored it, but hopefully, Obama will take care of the problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 07 Oct 2011 19:53:35 +0200, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

They should really bottle them, for use during subsequent periods of electrical drought.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not serious in the least, just sick of people graduating from 8th grade without the faintest knowledge about anything electrical.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 6 Oct 2011 16:54:04 -0700 (PDT), Sam Takoy

A half loaded generator will run longer on the same tank of gas. Plus, the bigger generators often have a bigger gas tank so you don't have to go out at 3 am and fill it.
Buy your tools one time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.