Outside Wiring

Hello,
I plan on installing a flood light above my Deck. There is presently a small outside light about six feet above the Deck, so with the new floodlight mounted about the height of the second story, we are talking a vertical run of perhaps ten feet or so. Would connect at the present small Deck light box.
My first thought was to run the wire in the normal grey plastic conduit, or perhaps snake it inside the wall, somehow.
But I realized that the normal house service 220 V wires run from the vertical power line drop to the inside of the house opposite the service box in the basement, so apparently it is code-compliant to run the correct type of electrical wiring vertically on the outside of the house siding without being in conduit.
The simplest thing would of course be for me to just run a suitable wire against the siding on the outside, without any conduit.
What are the code requirements for this application (simple 110 V, 14 gage wire) ? I doubt that the regular NM-14 has an appropriate sheathing for this application ?
What type of wire is code approved for this type of application, and what would I want ?
Any caveats or not apparent or obvious Code requirements ?
I do have some NM wire approved for direcdt ground burial (per the label on the box) Sure does have a tough outer sheath. Would this be O.K., perhaps ?
Whatever I do, i want to be 100% sure that it is Code compliant.
Much thanks, as always, Bob
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You first have to install an outdoor raintight extension box on to the existing flush wall box, then you can use PVC, which is probably the neatest thing to do, or if it's an old house with balloon framing you could snake inside the wall from the existing box to the new location, or using approved rain tight UF connectors, run sunlight resistant UF from the existing location to the new location

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In the past, I've always run NM 2 w/ground (romex) from the panel to a junction box right near where I will be existing the house. Inside the junction box I transition to individual stranded wires (rated for outdoor use) which I pull through the PVC to a raintight box.
The single conductors are much eaiser to pull through the pvc, especially if you need to make any turns.
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Robert11 wrote:

Out of sight, out of mind. I would go up the inside wall to the attic and out where my new light would go.
--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 :) 7/8

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On Feb 12, 9:44 am, "Blattus Slafaly £ ¥ 0/00 :)"

re: I would go up the inside wall to the attic and out where my new light would go
Where possible, this is not a bad idea. Unfortunately, this is not always feasible.
The front & rear exterior walls of my house are not accessible via the attic. The ceiling in the bedrooms slant down, following the rafters, leaving about 3 inches of wall above the windows. The soffit is right above the window. To place a fixture on an exterior wall, you would have to go through the wall in the living space. Doable, but a lot more work than conduit.
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This is a common upgrade.

I would choose conduit. Your "snake it inside the wall, somehow" does not instill confidence in this electrician. Fishing walls, particularly the longer the run, can be very difficult. If the wall is insulated, all bets are off, even for a professional wireman.

Presumably, it WAS code-compliant when the main service line was installed. It may no longer be compliant.

Yech! Exposed cabling of this type on the exterior of an otherwise nice home looks TERRIBLE. I wouldn't do it even if it was up to code. Use conduit.

NM/NM-B is NOT rated for your intended use.

14/2 w/grd UF - even if in conduit.

Make your installation as nice/tough/durable as possible. If using non-metallic tubing, use approved "plastic" conduit suitable for your application. (UV-stabilized)

Then is probably is NOT type NM.

That sounds like UF - as it should be.

If it IS 'UF', it's OK to use.

Ensure that all boxes, fittings and conduit are rated as "rain tight", use 14/2 w/grd Type UF and you should be good to go. Good luck!
--
:)
JR

Climb poles and dig holes
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...

...
The only way to answer those questions is to talk to your local Code Enforcement Office to see what the specific rules for your own locale are. Every location tends to have slightly different requirements.
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No you don't.
If it's approved for direct burial, then it's not NM; conversely, if it is NM, it's not approved for direct burial.
You might have UF; I can't see it from here, so it's kinda hard to tell -- but I don't have to see it to know that *no* NM cable is approved for direct burial. Never has been. Never will be.
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Robert11 wrote:

Since you want to be 100% Code compliant, it make your job a little easier.
First, you have to realize that the NEC does not dictate what code you follow, rather your local city does. Most cities adopt the NEC and make small changes and amendments to the code. The city of Portland has the following rule in their code:
26.06.010 Required. Before any electrical work covered by this Title may be installed, altered or repaired, a permit shall be obtained from the Electrical Division.
I assume most cities have similar rules. Now all you have to do is go to your building department and apply for a permit. They will answer all of your questions with answers that are guaranteed to meet your local code 100%.
Assuming you really only meant to be 99% compliant, skipping the above rule, then follow the advice the others are giving you.
-Mike
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