Outside Painting Question

Hello,
Have a typical Colonial with horiz. wooden siding. The typical.
Needs a paint job, but not sure how this would be handled.
About, perhaps, 5% to 10 % of the paint is peeling.
O.K., I can certainly have that amount sanded down, and feathered prior to any new paint.
But, any new paint only relies on the paint already down for adhesion I would think. The new paint would only see what it is painted on; the old paint.
The new paint never sees the actual wood underneath (except for the small amount sanded down).
So, how does one ensure that the new paint will also not peel away as soon as the old stuff probably will ?
Can't sand it all, way too much.
How is a situation like this handled ? What am I missing ?
Thanks, Bob
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On Monday, August 31, 2015 at 12:17:59 PM UTC-4, Bob wrote:

It depends on why the existing paint is peeling. If it lasted normal life+ and it's starting to peel from age, that's normal. If it was put on and within a few years it's peeling, that suggests an underlying problem that needs to be solved.
Assuming it's #1, then your plan to scrape, sand, etc the peeled areas is the right one. Actually, I'd suggest using a Wagner paint eater. It has a rough pad, like a super strong version of a pot scrubbing pad. It's the best thing I've found for removing peeling paint. Should be power washed first. Then I'd recommend using XIM Peel Bond on the bare areas. It's a very thick primer that helps level out the uneven areas and it's an excellent adhesion primer too.
Then use two coats of a good paint. I prefer Benjamin Moore.
And to answer your question, you're relying on the rest of the old paint to be sound, so that it won't peel once covered and protected by the new paint.
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In alt.home.repair, on Mon, 31 Aug 2015 12:17:27 -0400, Bob

Painters all over paint houses without sanding the whole thing and usually the parts that were good before painting don't peel after painting. And like you say, you've scraped and even sanded the parts that were peeling, so they're good too.
Perhaps some marginal areas you didn't treat will peel later.
So, use latex paint which can be patched without the difference or the border showing, and save matching paint to do that if necessary. Save a whole gallon if your house is big. Although supposedly you can get matching paint at the paint store if you show them the color you want. So at least paint something removed or removeable.
When I moved in to this house, the previous owner gave me the owners manuals for everything and the receipts for many things, including the kitchen floor and the carpet. I went there to buy spare for repairs. It was 4 years later but they still had the same vinyl llinoleum and I bought a piece, but they had no carpeting. I asked her why the installers didn't leave extra for patching. She said, When we do that the housewives call up and complain. I don't know why they can't explain the purpose of the scraps to these housewives.
The seller even told me he spilled paint in the middle of the big bedroom and had to cut a patch from the closet. I think I found the place where he put the patch in, but I never found the place he took the patch out. I guess he cleaned the painted part as well as he could and put it back where the patch had come from, but I still don't see how I missed it.

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if theres lead in any of the paint of your home, sanding can cause a hazard, and get you in trouble.
scraping is ok, but tarp everything before beginning
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Maybe the hospital or morgue, though.
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On Monday, August 31, 2015 at 10:50:13 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Primer's purpose isn't to keep the remaining existing paint from peeling off.
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On 8/31/2015 11:17 AM, Bob wrote:

XIM 11461 High Build Water Based Bonding Primer/Sealer
Clear high build, water based strong bonding primer, sealer and filler Use with Latex topcoats Penetrates Acrylic Latex and elastomeric paints, bonds to old paint, wood, plywood, T1-11, PVC, Aluminum, Galvanized Metal, Brick and Stucco
http://www.rustoleum.com/~/media/DigitalEncyclopedia/Documents/RustoleumUSA/TDS/English/CBG/XIM/XIM-02_Peel_Bond_High-Build_Bonding_Primer_Sealer_TDS.ashx
Read the reviews on Amazon.
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On Tuesday, September 1, 2015 at 3:50:47 PM UTC-4, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

That's the XIM Peel Bond that I recommended. I highly recommend it. It's very thick so it helps even out the transition areas between the bare spots and the painted spots after scraping, sanding, etc. That's in addition to being an excellent primer.
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