Outlets -- which way?

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The ground pin should always be down. Reason: Certain plug-in items won't hang correctly if the outlet is upside down. Example: Extension cords with those flat plugs on the end, or appliance extension cords - those really thick ones. You may say "I have no intention of having an appliance in my living room", and that would be true. But, you *will* have one of those extension cords or something similar in the future.
Next time you're at Home Despot or Staples, take a look at the plugs on Belkin surge suppressors.
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On Tue, 05 Dec 2006 12:46:16 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

You're likely to have multiple wall-warts.

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On Tue, 05 Dec 2006 10:15:21 -0600, Mark Lloyd

What is a wall-wart?
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Terry wrote:

Those little power supplies that you plug into the electrical outlets... PITA
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wrote:

Just last night on Jay Leno's "Headlines" was a headline from a local paper, "Plans for new Wal-Wart under discussion."

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wrote:

I had one that came with a fax machine. It was 10 inches high and had a polarized plug. It wouldn't do very well in an upside-down receptacle.
Some catalogs sell a thing that' supposed to help. It's a 1-foot 1-outlet extension cord that costs too much. Use a regular extension cord and you can use 2 or 3 wall-warts.
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wrote:

Usually. There's also remote control (X10, etc..) modules and surge suppressors.
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wrote:

Something that looks like a cancerous growth on the wall. These are usually power supplies for equipment.
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Terry wrote:

It's a place where low lifes and illegal immigrants hang out while stuffing themselves with greasy cheeseburgers and french fries waiting for cancer or diabetes so they can go get meical to pay for their ailments. Nice place really, lovely in the summertime.
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wrote:

It's when the wall seems to have a growth on it, because of some oversized thing on a cord instead of a plug. Often a power supply for something.
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Not any more. . New appliances will hang better with the pin up. This is becoming standard practice in the industry.
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WHAT industry? Hospitals? Not homes though.
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"Edwin Pawlowski" < snipped-for-privacy@snet.net> wrote in message
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On Tue, 5 Dec 2006 11:06:21 -0600, "Steve Barker LT"
I have several appliances with cords designed for ground-up receptacles.
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Take a look. Many new homes are being done that way.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

More fuel on the fire! While not confirming the above, Friday I visited a brand new Mazda dealership building about 90% complete, and throughout the entire service, parts and public area were duplex outlets with...are you ready for this?...the grounds at the top. It would appear that in our Central Illinois area at least, our tradesmen are following the grounds-up practice in commercial buildings. I think I'll do a little investigation of our newest McMansions under construction and see what the hoi polloi prefer.
Joe
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

Every building I worked in at my PPoE (dozens over 30+ years) was ground-up. I was told that it was because of the metal studs, covers, and partitions. Any falling object would contact the ground pin first.

I'v never seen it in residential construction, since metal is kinda rare. There may be a lesson here...
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Edwin Pawlowski spake thus:

This is contrary to my experience, which shows me that most 3-prong plugs tend to stay in better with the grounding pin up (the opposite of the way most outlets are installed).
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Don Fearn wrote:

There does not seem to be any rule on this. While the convention is with the ground down looking like two eyes and a mouth, I suggest ground up is better. In the event that something gets dropped onto a plug it would hit the ground first. Since accidental contact is much more likely to come from above and not below, I believe that is a safer arrangement. I also believe it is not material in real live. I put mine in ground up and I usually switch any that I work on.
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I remember when I had a house built on Long Island. All the grounds were pointed down except one outlet in every room. When I asked the builder why he told me that this was his electricians way of pointing out the outlets that were switched on and off by a wall switch.
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I agree with this that someone wrote above:
"The ground pin should always be down. Reason: Certain plug-in items won't hang correctly if the outlet is upside down. Example: Extension cords with those flat plugs on the end, or appliance extension cords - those really thick ones. You may say "I have no intention of having an appliance in my living room", and that would be true. But, you *will* have one of those
extension cords or something similar in the future"
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