outlets per circuit question

In Ontario, according to one simplified guide, you can have up to 12 outlets per circuit -- either light outlets or plug outlets, or both. But after studying the guide, I'm not clear on this:
Does a standard AC wall outlet with two receptacles count as one "outlet" or two?
-- "For it is only of the new one grows tired. Of the old one never tires." -- Kierkegaard, _Repetition_
James Owens, Ottawa, Canada
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On 14 Sep 2004 09:27:06 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (James Owens) wrote:

...thehick
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If I remember correctly, in US it counts as 180 watts...ie 1.8

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The Canadian rule of 12 fixtures per circuit applies to lighting and general purpose circuits only. If you have a circuit with 11 fixtures/outlets, you can add one additional fixture or outlet. That doesn't necessarily mean that you should be plugging an air conditioner into that outlet.
I believe the CEC states that a wall A/C should be on a dedicated circuit. Of course if it's an existing home, you could plug it into any circuit. I'd make sure you don't have any hydro-hungry appliances like fridge/microwave on the circuit, and I wouldn't be plugging any hair dryers into the same circuit.
Mr Fixit eh! from Belleville
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Here in the USA I use for residential load calculations 180 watts per outlet or lights. Unless I am privileged to an separate load that is known then I use it in the calculations only if it is bigger than 180w. So on an 15 amp circuit you could install 6 duplex recpts. The circuit load is 80% of the breaker size.
Pretty sure Canada follows this formula
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wrote: <snip>

the code, but it ISN'T the code. always wise to split bewteen outlets and known loads such as lights anyway. and wise also to use less outlets than the max the code allows. ...thehick
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This does not apply to residential wiring.
A 2nd floor addition measuring 22' x 21' (462 sq. ft.) would require ONE 15a circuit for all 3 bedrooms. (462 sq. ft. x 3 watts per sq. ft = 1386 watts) It doesn't matter if each bedroom has 4 duplex receptacles or 40 duplex receptacles or has plugmold with an outlet every 6" on center around the perimeter of each room.

That math would put an electrical contractor out of business before the paint on the sign dried.

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On 14 Sep 2004 09:27:06 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (James Owens) wrote:

One. In places where you intend to draw more current, use fewer outlets and more circuits. When I built my wood shop, I leap-frogged the circuits around the shop so that adjacent outlets are on a different circuit. The lighting should be on a separate circuit, although this may not be required.
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Don't forget that the OP asked: <<In Ontario, according to one simplified guide, you can have up to 12 outlets per circuit -- either light outlets or plug outlets, or both. But after studying the guide, I'm not clear on this:
Does a standard AC wall outlet with two receptacles count as one "outlet" or two? >>
It is true. The Canadian Electrical Code allows a maximum of 12 outlets per circuit for 15A lighting and general purpose circuits. The CEC does not require a dedicated circuit for a wall A/C, but it is recommended.
The answer for the OP is that a standard AC wall outlet with two receptacles counts as one outlet for CEC purposes.
Of course the other comments above are valid. If he's wiring in a new A/C unit, he should probably run a separate circuit because of the high current draw. If it is existing wiring, he should be careful when he is running the A/C not to draw much additional current from other outlets on the circuit.
There is a small forum on Canadian Electrical Code at www.selfhelpforums.com at which you might get additional help.
Mr Fixit eh in Belleville, Ontario
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On 15 Sep 2004 18:27:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Steve Nekias) wrote:

Maybe he was asking about AC as opposed to DC and wasn't asking about A/C at all?

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Funny, I assumed OP meant A/C.
If the OP meant AC, then the answer is that one duplex receptacle is considered as one device. The CEC allows 12 devices (excluding switches)on a general purpose circuit.
Mr Fixit eh from Ontario
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Alan ( snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com) writes:

So _that's_ how air conditioners got into it! No, I meant alternating current -- redundant information, I suppose. Sorry to have caused confusion, and thanks for the answer. There is no A/C involved but I will probably not wire all 12 outlets -- maybe 10 per circuit. I do plan to mix lighting fixtures and receptacles on each circuit. Also I will have more in each room than is required to meet the code's "within six feet of any point along the wall" specification. Thanks to all.
Now what's an "OP"?
-- "For it is only of the new one grows tired. Of the old one never tires." -- Kierkegaard, _Repetition_
James Owens, Ottawa, Canada
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snipped-for-privacy@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (James Owens) wrote in message (Steve Nekias)

OP is "original poster". That's you. Aren't your ears burning...?
A duplex outlet counts as one outlet-thing, as has been mentioned. Simplex outlets are rare, duplex outlets are the norm, even (strangely enough) on "dedicated" circuits like for fridges and freezers. I do presume they are legal to install for that purpose.
Since you're mixing lighting fixtures and plug outlets, bear in mind that per Canadian code, if there is even one light fixture ("lighting outlet") on the circuit, you may use only a 15A breaker, even if all the wiring is 12 gauge. (And no, I don't think I see the reason for such a rule.)
Chip C Toronto
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