outlet replacements


I wanted to replace the outlets in my house. They are 40 years old and many of them are in pretty sad shape. They work, but they've been painted over and are just at the end of their useful life.
I live in Virginia, do I need to get this kind of work inspected? Do I need a permit to do it?
Tony Giaccone
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Tony wrote:

area as you. Its a very easy project for one that has very basic electrical experience.
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It is pretty simple, but you do need to make sure you understand which wire goes where.
Don't buy cheap outlets. Get "spec grade" ones for a better connection and life.
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Tony wrote:

Most places will let a home owner do their own work without permits and inspections as long as it is just replacing existing components.
Are the current outlets grounded '3 hole' type? Do you have copper or aluminum wiring?
If they are not grounded it complicates things a bit as you will need to add grounds or use GFCI outlets.
If AL you will need to buy $pecial outlets and connector$ for AL wires.
Kevin
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Kevin Ricks wrote:

Totally agree. You can probably do all the replacing, but you might want to know what to look for in case there are (and there always are) problems like Al wire, grounding problems, etc...
So, I don't have a clue what the bylaws are in your area, but a good wiring book from the library would be worth it (free) to have as a reference as you go...
a
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If the old outlets are grounded, you can replace them with new grounded outlets. HOWEVER, you are supposed to bring the box up to code. That means the ground wire attaches to the BOX and the green screw on the outlet. If the box is grounded using the conduit, you have to install a green screw or clip and run the wire from the box to the outlet.
This isn't hard to do and really improves your safety factor.
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On Sun, 21 Sep 2008 12:45:05 -0700, Tony wrote:

When you do it, just keep in mind Cowboy movies:
The guy in the black hat is the bad guy, The good guy wears a white hat.
The wider blade is a good, and should meet the good guy, the Weasel thin blade is a bad one, always hooked up with bad guys.
The round one is the school mam', who meets up with the good guy eventually, down in the quite of the basement. She likes Green. She also goes to church, she wants to save your soul.
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Phil Again wrote:

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Ok, so here's the deal. I started and all the outlets I've replaced so far are grounded. So I'm replacing with similar outlets, bought at HD. Each room has one outlet thats switched, BWG coming in and out and a third line thats BWRG going out. I'm cool with that. I'm also a suspender and belt guy. I have a multi-meter and I throw the 2 breakers for all the outlets and lights on the second floor, then test each outlet with the multi-meter before I start to replace the outlet, on the switches, I try to get in and check the switch to make sure there's no power.
Most of my electrical experience is with DC, not AC, so I started out a little confused, but I'm getting the hang of it. However, I've come across one outlet that's got me stumped.
The black wire (hot) measured to ground shows 120V. Black measured to white shows about 80V and white to ground shows 40. WTF? Anyone have any idea what might be causing this?
Tony
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Tony wrote:

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Tony Hwang wrote:

If he's only got 80 V between black and white, that's not the issue.
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Tony wrote:

Yeah, it's an AC thing which you may never have encountered in fooling with DC. It's called "inductive coupling" wherein current flow is induced in nearby components (wire). Your meter is of sufficiently high impedance (AC resistance) to detect this minuscule (like nano-amps) current flow.
Ignore the reading.
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wrote:

Do not ignore that it seems that you neutral is not true neutral it maybe used some place as a ground and if this have anything to do with three way switch that you may have voltage drop across the load whatever that may be. do not ignore that power use if you most light bulb with pig tells across see if is going to light up partially. good luck Tony

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wrote:

Check with your local government office. Best to leave the outlets alone.
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